Books

Eradicating Smallpox in Ethiopia: Peace Corps Volunteers’ Accounts of Their Adventures, Challenges and Achievements

Looking to prep for an disaster?   Consider studying history to see how people dealt with everyday life without modern comforts.  

Eradicating Smallpox in Ethiopia: Peace Corps Volunteers’ Accounts of Their Adventures, Challenges and Achievements – $17.95
Description:
Winner of the 2020 Moritz Thomsen Experience Award for “the best depiction of life in the Peace Corps.””This book is an important addition to the historical record about the first human disease to be eradicated.” Dr. D.A. Henderson, Director of the World Health Organization’s Global Smallpox Eradication Program, 1966-77 “This book serves up large dollops of nostalgia, humor, delightful tales of…

Life in a Medieval Castle (Medieval Life) – $16.99
Description
Medievalists Joseph and Frances Gies offer an exquisite portrait of what day-to-day life was actually like during the era, and of the key role the castle played. The Gieses write eloquently about the many people whose lives revolved around the castle, from the lord and lady to the commoners of the surrounding village. We discover what lords and serfs alike would have worn, eaten, and done for leisure; the songs sung; and the codes of sexual conduct that maintained order. We learn of the essential role of honor in medieval culture, the initiation process undertaken by knights, and how castles attempted to keep the constant threats of outside violence at bay.

Medieval Bodies: Life, Death and Art in the Middle Ages (Wellcome Collection) – $18.09
Description
In this richly-illustrated and unusual history, Jack Hartnell uncovers the fascinating ways in which people thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves in the Middle Ages, from Constantinople to Cairo and Canterbury.

Daily Life in the Middle Ages – $29.95

Life in a Medieval Village (Medieval Life) – $16.99
Medieval history comes alive in Joseph and Frances Gies’s classic bestseller on life in medieval villages […]

Kevin Felts, blogger and political commentator
Political Opinion

Rome And The Divided United States

People love to point to the similarities between the United States and Rome. From time to time someone may say, “Rome did this or that, just like what is happening to the United States.”

Sometimes I can see their point, but other times I can not. Rome faced a number of issues, which all contributed to its downfall. However, there is one major issue Rome faced that I see in the United States, and that was a divided people.

Over the centuries Rome conquered a number of peoples. The people of Rome, in their infinite wisdom, decided to allow the conquered groups to elect senators. When those senators went to Rome, they had no attachment to preserving the republic.

How does that compare to the United States? […]

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Homesteading

Starting Livestock Fence Project

2017 is the year I fence in several acres for livestock. I have been talking about this for several years, and this year is when I take action to put the project into motion.

One of my favorite books about medieval life, which is Life in a Medieval Village by Frances and Joseph Gies, talks about how people valued small livestock. Cattle were mainly for milk production, which was used to make cheese and butter.

In medieval times there was no way to preserve meat for long periods. If a 500 pound cow was butchered, a large amount of meat would rot and go to waste. Based on that, I am going to focus on small livestock and just a couple of cattle.

I would like to have around 6 or 7 acres fenced in for goats, sheep and a couple of cattle.

Just outside the livestock fence I am working on a wildlife habitat area for deer, squirrels and rabbits.

Pole Barn

[…]

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Books

Life In a Medieval Castle By Joseph and Frances Gies

If you have ever wondered what life in a medieval castle was like, this is the book for you. Joseph and Frances Gies describes in great detail everything from how, why and when castles were first built, their evolution and finally their decline.

While reading life in a medieval castle I sometimes forgot this was a book about castles. The authors offer such a wide spectrum of history that surrounds castles that it is easy to lose oneself in the book.

Chapters include:

The castle comes to england
The lord
The castle as a house
The lady
The household
A day in the castle – which I found very interesting
Hunting as a way of life
The villagers
The making of a knight
The castle at war – another chapter I found interesting
The castle year
The decline of the castle […]

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Political Opinion

Where would humanity be without religion

Over the past few decades there has been a move away from religion. The mindset seems to be, who needs religion when we have science?

Science does not unify people under a common idea, science does not teach a code of morals and values. How many atheist charities are there compared to religion based charities? When a family needs assistance, does the local atheist take up donations?

Where would society be today if religion never existed? I figure we would still be in the iron age, or about 20% behind where we are today.

100,000 – 8,000 years ago

Something happened around 6,000 or 8,000 years ago that made mankind stop roaming the countryside looking for food. What made mankind set down the seeds of civilization? We raised livestock, we planted gardens, we formed communities, we formed nations, we formed governments. Why did it take humanity over 100,000 years to go from hunter gathers, to building nations?

Why was mankind on the planet for 100,000 years, then all of a sudden there was a growth on society in the past 6,000 years? What about the other 94,000 years? What happened for society not to develop?

Why did humanity all of a sudden develop over the past 4,000 – 8,000 years?

Why didn’t we have cities and government 50,000 years ago?

What changed between 100,000 years ago, and 6,000 years ago?

Our modern human civilization began when we moved from a hunter / gatherer, to a farmer / gardener.
[…]

Kevin Felts, blogger and political commentator
Disaster Preparedness

Human innovation after a collapse

If there is something about humans that has ensured the survival of the human race, it has to be our level of creativity and our level of innovation.

If a man (or woman) has an axe, they can cut trees to build a home. that axe allows them to clear land for crops or livestock which will help ensure a steady supply of food.

If a man has a pole line and hook, they will catch fish.

Give a man some seeds and he will grow a garden.

What makes today so much different then 1348

For those of you that do not know what happened in 1348, that is when the Black Death (bubonic plague) entered Europe. Possibly as many as 1/3 of the entire population of Europe died between 1348 – 1350.

Humans have harnessed science. Not that we fully understand science, but at least we have some kind of working grasp. We have vaccines, antibiotics, medical care, hospitals and trained medical professionals. […]

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Books

Life in a Medieval village by Frances and Joseph Gies

Life in a Medieval Castle by Frances and Joseph Gies is an outstanding read for any survivalist who wants a better understanding of how people survived the medieval ages. The book covers peasant life from around the 1100s to what happens after the Black Death of 1348 and 1350.

Just about every detail of daily life is described; such as what crops were raised, what farm animals were raised, what uses the animals served, what services the animals preformed, which animals were best for butchering, which ones were not butchered, what people ate, and the difficulties that people ran into.

One example is that crop fields slowly turned into sheep fields. Sheep served several purposes – meat, milk, wool and skin for writing. People could make more money by raising sheep and exporting their wool, then could be made from growing food crops. […]

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Disaster Preparedness

An Historical Account of the Plague

An historical account of the plague: and other pestilential distempers….. was written by R. Goodwin, Richard Burdekin, published by R. Burdekin in 1832 (Original from Oxford University), digitized for Google books on Apr 19, 2006 […]