Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: wildlife conservation

Watch The Dogs And I Walk Around The Farm

Puppy on a nature walk

Dogs and I went for a walk around the farm and made a video about it. I was looking for oak trees that may have blown over during a recent storm. The roots of oak trees run close to the top of the soil. When the soil becomes saturated, and then we get some high winds, there is a chance an oak tree will uproot an fall over.

Once we find a tree that has blown over, it is just a matter of cutting the tree up and splitting it for firewood. Unfortunately, we did not find any blown over trees this trip.

Pine trees on the other hand, they have a deeo tap root that is supposed to be around half as deep as the tree is tall. Because of the tap root, pine trees rarely blow over. If the winds get high enough, a pine tree is more likely to snap in half than blow over.

Nature Conservation Area

Planting Loblolly and Longleaf seeds

Tree Hugger

When settlers moved into the southern portion of the United States they were greeted by vast forest of Longleaf and Loblolly pine trees. These were majestic trees reaching heights of over 100 feet tall.

Human greed knows no ends. Vast tracts of virgin timber were cut down with no regard to conservation or the effects upon wildlife. By the time the 1930s arrived the Southeast Texas wild Turkey and Whitetail Deer were pretty much extinct. Because their populations had been decimated, turkey and deer had to be reintroduced to regions of Southeast Texas.

The Red-cockaded woodpecker which nest exclusively in Longleaf pine trees was almost made extinct by deforestation. The woodpecker covers less than 1% of its original territory.

What lessons did we learn from deforestation and habitat destruction? Not much. Timber companies still cut down old growth oak trees to make way for pine plantations. Thousands of acres are clear cut and replanted in fast growing hybrid pine trees. Old growth forest are gone forever, or are they?

One of my projects here on the farm is to restore a few acres for old growth oak and pine trees.

Extinction of the Passenger Pigeons

From time to time I pick a topic, then do research on the given topic.

Tonights topic was the Passenger Pigeon.

How could mankind take a species that numbers in the billions and hunt them into extinction? Were the people blind, or they just did not care?

As long as people were making money harvesting Passenger Pigeons, did they give any thought about what would happen if an entire species was wiped out?

Sometimes I am ashamed of humanity. While reading about how the passenger pigeon was slaughtered, I was very, very ashamed. Are humans so narrow minded and short sighted that we can not see what is happening in front of our faces?

Past the Passenger Pigeon

In the early 1900s millions of long leaf pine trees were clear cut. This deforestation contributed to the decimation of the wild turkey flocks and white tail deer in places like southeast Texas. It was a combination of deforestation and overhunting from the great depression that wiped out wildlife stocks.

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018