Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: Urban Survival

Survival items for your car

toyota t100 truckMy wife and I went home for lunch, turned on the TV, and there was this lady who was talking about items everyone should keep in their car. 1 thing she listed was a digital tire pressure gauge. She went on to talk about how nobody uses those $1 stem pressure gauges. About this time, I started thinking “lady, do you even own a car or truck?” 1 thing about those old style stem tire gauges compared to a newer digital one – the battery will never go dead. Usually, when I put something in my truck or my wifes SUV, it might stay in there for months before its used.

1. Hand crank cell phone charger – one of the big drawbacks to modern technology, they require power. Cells phones make calling people easy, but the phone has to be charged. This is where a hand crank cell phone charger comes in – it makes sure you have a working phone when you need it.

Urban Survival and Safe Drinking Water

Over the past few weeks I have been putting a lot of thought into the availability of safe drinking water in an urban survival situation. Its not enough to have access to “water”, when its not safe to drink.

Its common knowledge that people require food, water and shelter to live. From those three points it breaks down into sub categories. Such as what kind of food, what kind of shelter and what kind of water.

I have decided to break my water preps into 3 simple phases based on the amount of safe drinking water you have access to – short term, mid term, long term.

Short term – this is your bottled water. Regardless if its 1 pint plastic bottles, or 55 gallon drums, this is your short term solution.

Home Grown Onions Are One Of The Easiest Crops To Grow

Home grown onions

Home grown onions are an easy item to grow. Even for those gardeners that have a black thumb and kill everything they touch, onions should still be able to live through the touch of death.

The way onions grow, they have several shoots that come off the main root. These shoots develop sugars, which then go into the bulb and help the bulb grow. When the shoots start to die, that is a sign that the sugars are going into the root ball.

When stored properly, most onion root balls can be stored through the winter. In early spring some types of onions will start developing shoots, which is a sign that they should be planted.

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018