Homesteading and Survivalism

Living a simple life

Tag: trees

Moving To The Homestead Part 2

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This is part 2 of a moving to the Homestead series.  See this link for part 1.

Kevin Felts, blogger and survivalistWhere do you want to be in 10 years, how about 20 years?  That question is not about financial stability, or your career, where do you want to be physically in 10 years, what do you want your life to be like?

I want peace and quiet in my life.  I want a back porch where I can grill some steaks, listen to the wind blowing through the trees, hear the chickens,,, and that is all I want to hear, except maybe some music.

I want a small garden that my wife and I can get fresh food from.

I want my chickens to be able to free range as much as they want, because happy chickens lay plenty of eggs.

Where do I want to be next year (2013)?  I want to be living in peace and quiet. But first, my wife and I have to get there.

One of the things that has to be taken care of before we are able to put a house on the land, is some of the timber has to be cleared.  As much as I despise cutting trees, we have to make room for a home.  Not only room for a home, but the fence rows need to be cut.

Nobody has lived at the Homestead full time since the late 1970s, which was when my grandmother passed away. Mom and dad moved from the Jasper Texas area in the late 1970s and have lived in Bridge City for the past 35 years.

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Survival gear neoprene gloves

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Neoprene gloves are my preference for cold weather. But these are only good to around 30 degrees. Once the temperature reaches the mid 30’s, I have a pair of thin, insulated gloves that I put on, and then pull the neoprene gloves over them. The rubber of the Neoprene allows the gloves to stretch over the first pair.

With this combination I have a glove system that is good down into the 20’s and provides a good no slip grip.

If you wish to comment on this video, please do so in this thread at the  survival gear forum.

Survival Gear – Splitting Mauls

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Splitting mauls are different from an axe.  The maul is heavier and wider then and axe and usually has a dull edge.  The back side of the maul is sometimes flat so a sledge hammer can be used to drive it through blocks of wood.

Every survivalist should have a way to cut firewood in their tools.  In this case its an axe, machete for cutting small limbs a sledge hammer and a splitting maul.

Stacking Firewood

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Firewood, for a long term S hit the fan situation, its going to be the primary way that people are going to be cooking and heating their homes.

One of the ways I’am going to be using firewood post-SHTF is in my wood burning barbeque pit. It has a cooking surface 6 feet 9 inches long, and is 29 inches across. In other words, I wanted something big enough that I could cook a hog or a deer on it.

When stacking firewood in the truck or trailer, its very important not to stack the wood too high.  If the wood is stacked too high, there is a chance of the wood rolling off the truck or trailer when turns are made when driving home.

To prevent the logs from rolling, stack them only as high as the top of the truck or trailer. And maybe lash the wood down with some straps.

Logs that roll off during transportation pose a safety hazard to other vehicles on the road.   Extreme care should be taken to make sure that your firewood collection does not harm those that have to share the road with you.

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