Homesteading and Survivalism

Ramblings Of A Bored Survivalist

BGS the key to long term survival

Posted by Kevin Felts On December 22, 2012 0 Comments

Kevin Felts, blogger and survivalistBeans, Guns and Seeds – the three things that are key to surviving a long term SHTF situation. Water should be a given, there there is no real need in discussing that. If someone needs to be reminded that they need safe drinking water, then natural selection needs to take effect.

Why do I put Beans, Guns and Seeds in that order? Why not have it GSB, or BSG,,, or some other combination?

Beans – your food stockpile

Guns – security

Seeds – renewable and sustainable food sources

A few weeks ago a buddy of mine and I were talking about food during a long term SHTF event. Most survivalist have some kind of food stockpile. But once those food stores run out, what then?

Group 1 – Bug out to the wilderness to live off the land.

Group 2 – Have some kind of homestead setup with a garden, livestock, fruit trees,,, renewable and sustainable food sources.

Chances are group 1 is going to develop dysentery, and either starve to death, or die from some kind of infection.

Group 2 will have shelter, fresh food, safe drinking water, security, private property,,,.

Ask yourself, if society as we know it right now, where would you rather be, camping in the wilderness, or safe at home in your bed.

Some examples of my BGS theory:




Source Of Fresh Meat After SHTF

Posted by Kevin Felts On December 14, 2012 0 Comments

What is your long term plan for fresh meat after SHTF? Do you plan on hunting, trapping or raising your own? What about a combination of all three?

This article is going to focus on 4 sources of fresh meat – chickens, pigs, goats and rabbits.

Chickens

In a previous article we discussed how many chickens would you need for SHTF. If you have not read that article, please do so. Here is a recap of the important information.Fresh yard eggs

Lets start with 10 people in our group, now lets estimate that those 10 people will be eating 2 eggs a day, which equals at least 20 eggs a day.

During the winter time egg laying can drop after a cold front passes through, or while the hen is molting.

For the sake of discussion, lets use my lowest egg count of 3 eggs from 13 hens. The 3 eggs were laid after a cold front passed through, and the hens were around 9 – 10 months old.




Sustainable food sources after TEOTWAWKI

Posted by Kevin Felts On August 27, 2012 0 Comments

What are your plans for a sustainable food source after SHTF / TEOTWAWKI? In other words, what are your food sources going to be during a long term disaster? Lets define long term as a disaster lasting at least 6 months. This could be a new disease, long term civil unrest, nuclear war, financial collapse,,, something that disrupts modern society.

This article will attempt to divide gathering food during a long term disaster into 3 categories: foraging, growing or raising food, and a combination of the two.

Foraging

For this article, foraging is defined as hunting, fishing, trapping, picking berries, digging roots,,,. Anything having to do with the collection of wild growing plants and animals.

Every year a buddy of mine and I spend three days camping on the Angelina River close to Jasper Texas. During those three days we go fishing, look for food, scout for wildlife,,, just try to put our Bug Out to the Wilderness skills to the test.

In a real life, most people that bug out to the wilderness will probably end up starving to death. Or, will be driven back to society in the search for food. That is if the person does not contract some kind of waterborne disease and die of dysentery.




Excess food supply

Posted by Kevin Felts On August 20, 2012 0 Comments
Home grown yard eggs

Over the past 2 days I have given away 2 dozen eggs. Some people might be saying “so what”? To give food away means that my wife and I have an excess food supply.

Think about that for a minute. My wife and I bought our first chicks February 25, 2012. In all we ended up with 13 chickens. The chickens started laying when they were around 5 months old. At close to 6 months old we are getting 6 – 7 eggs a day.

Home grown yard eggsWe are dealing with a couple of topics here, the time required to get your food production up and running, and being able to grow more food then you need.

I see a lot of survivalist saying that if SHTF they are going to get some chickens, goats, maybe a couple of cows,,, the usual stuff. I see those types of planes as being unrealistic. You think you are going to be the only person looking for farming supplies and livestock after SHTF / TEOTWAWKI?

Lets say you have a buddy that knows a friend whos second cousin has a few chickens they are willing to trade for 1,000 rounds of 223 Remington. After some bartering the two of you finally agree on 500 rounds of 223 Remington and 500 rounds of 7.62×39 for 2 laying hens.

You get your hens home, now what? Where are you going to keep them at? Do you have an enclosed yard to keep your chickens in, do you have a coop? Or do you plan on keeping the hens in your garage? Hopefully you will be lucky enough to find some hens that are already laying. If not, you are going to have to wait several months for the chicks to grow and start laying.

Its not just livestock, what does your seed stockpile look like? Do you have tools to work the field? Do you have access to a tractor, tiller, hoes, rakes and manpower needed to get a field ready to plant?

After you get your squash, cucumbers, zucchini, turnips, snap beans,,,,etc planted, you are looking at 60 – 90 days before you are going to harvest anything.




Our First Dozen Eggs

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 22, 2012 0 Comments

Dozen fresh yard eggsIts official, my wife and I got our first dozen eggs. The eggs are rather small, but they will get larger as the chicken matures. My aunt calls the first eggs a chicken lays “pullet eggs”.

The first egg was laid on July 14, 2012

The 12th eggs was laid on July 22, 2012.

The chickens went from laying one egg every other day, to laying 3 eggs in one day. For the past 3 days, the chickens have been laying 3 eggs a day.

It took around 4 months and 3 weeks before the first egg was laid. After the chickens starting laying, the rate of laying has picked up dramatically. Hopefully the rate of laying will continue to pick up over the next few weeks. As of right now, I think only 3 of my 13 hens are laying. When all of the hens start laying, I am hoping to get anywhere from 6 – 10 eggs a day.

My wife and I have 13 chickens:
2 Black Giants
1 Speckled Sussex
2 Barred Rocks (aka Plymouth Rocks)
2 Silver Laced Wyandotte
2 Australorps

From now on, my family and I do not have to buy our eggs from the grocery store. During a long term SHTF survival situation, my family will have a source of protein and a source of fresh food.

Chickens have been a vital food source to humans for thousands of years. There is no need to change now.




Prepping in the wrong order

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 10, 2012 12 Comments

Kevin Felts blogger and survivalistAfter talking to a buddy of mine, we came to the realization that most preppers stockpile in the wrong order.

When people get into prepping, what is the first things they start stockpiling? Most people lean towards stockpiling firearms and ammunition first.

Why do most people place buying a firearm at the top of their list? Maybe its the sense of security that owning a firearm provides? Maybe its the idea of the family being able to protect themselves? Maybe its a primal feeling where we feel safe and secure with a spear in our hands?

Ok, lets get back to prepping.

This is the way most people prep

1. Firearms

2. Short term food preps

3. Sustainable food preps

This is the way people should prep

1. Sustainable food preps

2. Short term food preps

3. Firearms

Sustainable Food Preps

Most preppers / survivalist put sustainable foods at the end of the list, so lets talk about this topic first.

Question, why do preppers focus on sustainable foods “after” they focus on a lot of other stuff?

Answer, in my opinion, its because planting a garden and having livestock takes a lot of time and effort. Its easier to buy a bunch of canned foods then it is to build a chicken coop.

My wife and I spent 3 weekends building our chicken coop, which also includes an enclosed run on the coop.