Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: survival

Food Supply Chains

Food Supply ChainsPlease Rate This Article During outbreaks of the plague in Europe, there was one major problem that faced the rich and poor alike – and that was the availability of food. The more moving parts a machine has, the more likely it is to break. The supply lines that feed the world are […]

16 Gallon Portable Water Drum

Storage Drum

Every survivalist should consider some kind of portable water solution. Whether this is 5 gallon buckets, 7 gallon drums or like in this video, 16 gallon drums.

The drum in this video will hold 16 gallons of water, but I only put 15 gallons in it. This is to leave a little head room. These drums originally held some kind of Dr. Pepper syrup. But its nothing that some soap and water will not wash out.

When the drums were bought and brought home, dish washing soap was squirted into the drum, a water hose was inserted into the mouth and the water hose turned on. The water was allowed to circulate through the drum for 10 – 15 minutes. Then the drum was turned over, drained, stood back up and the water hose reinserted.

Prepping Plans for 2009

Overlooking the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas

As I look back 0n 2008, I also look forward to 2009.

Over the past few months I have not been my usual self. Korey (my son) got a deer this hunting season, and so far that is all we have gotten is that one deer. Tomorrow is the last day of regular deer season, in 2 weeks there is a youth weekend. Hopefully between tomorrow and the youth weekend Korey or I will be able to get another deer. This will fill our freezer for the coming year.

January – my wife and I planted a bed of onions. I bought the onion sprouts 2 weeks ago but have not felt like planting them. The onions were a mix of 10-15Y and some smaller green onions for salads and baked potatoes.

10-15Y are a large onion developed by Texas A&M. When the bulb is ready to be harvested, it will be about the size of a baseball. These onions have a sweet taste and are good for putting on hamburgers.

February – Potatoes go in the ground around February 14th. My wife and I already have to seed potatoes in the shed.

This is also one of the months that I like to go camping.

Plant a couple of apple and peach trees.

The Survivalist Garden and Cucumbers

cucumber survivalist garden

While planning a survival garden that will be used during a prolonged disaster, cucumbers might be an important consideration.

During outbreaks of the Bubonic Plague (The Black Death) during the middle 1300’s, starvation might have killed as many people as the disease. As farmers and merchants died off from The Black Death, those that were still alive were left to a slow death of starvation. It was recorded in the journals of the witnesses to The Black Death – the starving masses even turned to cannibalism.

To prevent this type of situation from befalling family members and loved ones, every survivalist should have a stock of seeds for a home garden.

The cucumber belongs to the same plant family as watermelon, zucchini and pumpkin. Sometimes this is called the “Gourd” or “melon” family. This is because the plants can grow a hard outer shell. The benefit of this hard outer shell, most insects can not penetrate it to eat the softer inner flesh. This makes the cucumber somewhat pest resistant, as compared to other garden plants – such as the tomato.

Modern man has grown the cucumber for at least 3,000 years in Western Asia. Estimates are that the cucumber was introduced to parts of Europe by the Romans. The exact year of European introduction in unknown. Written records dating back to the Roman empire exist noting how much the cucumber was eaten in ancient times. As an example, the Roman Emperor Tiberius (November 16, 42 BC – March 16, AD 37) ate cucumbers on an almost daily basis. To ensure that cucumbers were on the dinner plate during the winter months, the plants were grown in carts. The carts were wheeled into the sunlight during the day, and brought inside during the night.

Wilderness Survival – Yaupon Holly

Yaupon Holly in Southeast Texas

Some wild animals and birds eat the Yaupon Holly, but the berries cause vomiting in humans. The latin name is Ilex vomitoria. Anything that has “vomit” in the name should be avoided.

The Yaupon Holly an evergreen shrub or small tree reaching 15 – 30 feet tall, with smooth, light gray bark and slender, hairy shoots. The leaves are alternate, ovate to elliptical with a rounded apex and crenate or coarsely serrated margin, about 2 inches long and about 1 inch across, glossy dark green above, slightly paler below. The flowers are 1/4 inch in diameter, with a white four-lobed corolla.

The picture below is of a Yaupon Holly bush in East Texas. Notice the bright red berries.

During the late fall and into the winter, the Yaupon Holly will sprout a bright red berry. The fruit is a small round or red (occasionally yellow) drupe about 1/4 inch in diameter containing four seeds, which are dispersed by birds eating the fruit. The species may be distinguished from the similar Ilex cassine by its smaller leaves with a rounded, not acute apex.

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018