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Long Term Survival Food Preps

Long term food storage

When someone says “survival food preps” or “stockpiling survival food”, what do you think of? Do you think of tons of dried rice and beans stored in mylar bags? How about a basement full of #10 cans, does that come to mind? Or is it a combination of several things?

When I was thinking of writing an article about survival food preps, the first thing that popped into my head was – MREs, canned goods and garden seeds. But where does perishable goods fit into that narrow picture?

For the first week or so people are going to be eating stuff out of their freezer. For the sake of discussion, lets move past that first week post SHTF. Something bad has happened, the food in the grocery stores has dried up, people have gone through their immediate perishable food items,,,, now what?

A book about the Roman military I just finished reading contained a quote from an ancient historian – “nothing caused as much stress within the troops as the lack of supplies.” Just like it says, when the supplies started to run low, the stress level went up. 2,000 years later, and nothing has changed.

Stockpiling a variety of food

Last weekend my kids and I went to the camp for 2 days; for our trip we packed a variety of food – some chips, several canned goods and some beef jerky. I’ll tell you what, after eating the same type of canned food for even 2 days, it was getting old and quick. This is where the thought of stockpiling beans and rice comes into mind. I have heard of survivalist stockpiling hudnreds of pounds of dried beans and dried rice for some kind of SHTF situation. The problem is, nobody wants to eat the same food day in and day out for weeks and months on end. After the first few days,,, maybe the first couple of weeks people are going to get sick of eating the same thing over and over. That is why its important to stockpile a variety of food for SHTF.

Not only does a variety of food make things easier to eat, varieties also cover a wider range of nutrients.

Five easy survival food preps

Stockpiling food for SHTFDon’t want to stockpile 1,000 pounds of dried rice and beans? Want something that taste a little better then MREs? Want something that you don’t have to worry about rotating out?

One of the main problems with stockpiling survival food preps, is that people sometimes stockpile what they do not normally eat. So the food stocks sit in a closet, expire, and have to be thrown out. In the long run its easier to stockpile what your family normally eats so rotation is handled in a natural manner.

What are the requirements for a survival food prep?

Nutrition content
Calorie content
At least 1 year shelf life
No special storage after opening / or, serving size so that the whole thing can be eaten after opening
Price
No special cooking requirements – open and eat, or heat and eat
Something your family normally eats
Considerations for special diets

Thoughts on stockpiling food for SHTF

eversafe meal mre survivalist foodOne of the survivalist mindsets that has been around for a long time, is that you need 1 years worth of food stockpiled; that you should have 1 years worth of food for every member in the house. If someone has the time and money to manage such a project, then good for you. But personally, I do not have the room, money, or time to put towards maintaining a 1 year food stockpile. Its no easy project to maintain all of that food without letting it expire or spoil. Expiration dates need to be kept along with a running inventory. If you eat out of your food stocks to keep everything rotated, then list will need to be kept as to what was eaten and what needs to be replaced.

I never have been one that subscribed to the “massive stockpiling of food” mindset. Stockpile food – yes. But not to the point where rotating your food and keeping track of inventory consumes a lot of your time. Over the years I have seen people that have dedicated a massive amount of time to their food stockpile – everything from calorie counting, to spreadsheets that list every single little item.

My plans are more like stockpile what you eat, and have normal food rotation. Instead of having 1 or 2 jars of pickles, have 3 jars. Instead of having 2 or 3 cans of ravioli, have 4 or 5. Instead of having 10 pounds of rice, have 30 pounds, instead of having 1 jar of honey, keep 2 or 3 in stock.

On top of that, I keep a nice stockpile of seeds for gardening.

I look at survivalist food preps as layers:

MREs Meals ready to eat

mre meal reay to eatThere is a thread on the forum that is talking about MREs, and it got me to thinking:

MREs are a good grab and go meal -what could be easier then just grabbing a full meal, stuffing it in your backpack, and your ready to go. The outside package is pretty tough and puncture resistant. MREs are the kind of thing that you can cram into the bottom of your pack, and you dont have to worry about them leaking, or getting a hole poked in them.

MREs are high in calories and have a high sodium content. As an example, the Spaghetti with meat sauce has 810mg of sodium. If your in the military and having to hump your pack 25 miles at a time, or in good physical shape, 810mg of sodium might seem like nothing. But for people with underlying health conditions, overweight, high blood pressure, 810mg for 1 meal can be a lot of sodium.

Related Articles:

Eversafe Meals

eversafe meal mre survivalist food

Storing MREs
mre meal reay to eat
MRE vs Mainstay
meal ready to eat vs mainstay meals

Feel the Future sale at Safecastle

Feel the Future sale at SafecastlePlease Rate This Article Our friends over at Safecastle are having a very nice sale on Mountain House foods. This is a limited time offer – August 1, 2010 – August 31, 2010. So if your looking at stocking up on some survival food, now is the time. Current Offers: […]

Spam as a survival food

Is spam the perfect survival food? That question was asked in this forum thread about spam. It seems that most people like talking about spam – whether its fried, cooked, cold, right out of the can,,,,,,, most people will have something to say about it. Even if they say its so nasty they would never eat it, that is still something they had to say.

Can of spam classic net weight – 340 grams (I dont know if that net weight includes the metal can).
Serving size – 56 grams
790mg of sodium per serving

Storing MREs

Awhile back I posted a video on youtube about storing MREs. Lets just say that some of the comments are either really funny, or really sad – depending on how you look at it.

It all started when a buddy of mine cleaned out his food stockpiles and gave me about 8 1/2 cases of MREs. Not being the one to pass up free food preps, I gladly accepted the MREs and loaded them up in the SUV. On the way home my wife and I decided to get one of those plastic shelving systems from a local big box mart.

One side of my sons closet was cleaned out, the shelving system was assembled and the MREs were put on the shelves in order to when the test / inspect date. The ones dated in 2011 were put on the bottom, the ones dated in 2010 on the second shelf up from the bottom, and the ones that your supposed to test were put on the third shelf up from the bottom. Some backpacks / daypacks were put on the very top shelf.

The following video is the one that I posted on youtube.

MRE VS Mainstay Meals

There is an interesting thread in the forums about MREs VS Mainstay Meals. Both types of meals are good for what they are designed to do. Its not a matter of which one is “the best”, its which one fits your needs the best.

MREs – have a short lifespan, especially if they are stored in a shed, or somewhere where it gets hot, say above 90 – 100 degrees. I think its something like 1 day over 100 degrees takes 1 month off the life expectancy – but dont quote me on that.

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