Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: soup recipes

Soup and Chowder Recipes

Stock is the basis of all soups made from meat, and is really the juice of the meat extracted by long and gentle simmering. In making stock for soup always use an agate or porcelain-lined stock pot. Use one quart of cold water to each pound of meat and bone. Use cheap cuts of meat for soup stock. Excellent stock may be made from bones and trimmings of meat and poultry. Wash soup bones and stewing meat quickly in cold water. Never allow a roast or piece of stewing meat to lie for a second in water. Aunt Sarah did not think that wiping meat with a damp cloth was all that was necessary (although many wise and good cooks to the contrary). Place meat and soup bones in a stock pot, pour over the requisite amount of soft, cold water to extract the juice and nutritive quality of the meat; allow it to come to a boil, then stand back on the range, where it will just simmer for 3 or 4 hours. Then add a sliced onion, several sprigs of parsley, small pieces of chopped celery tops, well-scraped roots of celery, and allow to simmer three-quarters of an hour longer. Season well with salt and pepper, 1 level teaspoonful of salt will season 1 quart of soup.

Strain through a fine sieve, stand aside, and when cool remove from lop the solid cake of fat which had formed and use for frying after it has been clarified. It is surprising to know the variety of soups made possible by the addition of a small quantity of vegetables or cereals to stock. A couple tablespoonfuls of rice or barley added to well-seasoned stock and you have rice or barley soup. A small quantity of stewed, sweet corn or noodles, frequently “left-overs,” finely diced or grated carrots, potatoes, celery or onions, and you have a vegetable soup. Strain the half can of tomatoes, a “left-over” from dinner, add a tablespoonful of butter, a seasoning of salt and pepper, chicken to a creamy consistency with a little cornstarch, add to cup of soup stock, serve with croutons of bread or crackers, and you have an appetizing addition to dinner or lunch.

CURRIED VEGETABLES

One-half cup dried peas, beans or lentils, soaked over night and cooked until tender.

½ cup turnips

½ cup of carrots

1 cup outer parts of celery

½ cup of peas

½ teaspoon celery salt

⅛ teaspoon pepper

3 tablespoons drippings

3 tablespoons whole wheat flour

1 teaspoon curry powder

1 teaspoon salt

½ cup meat stock or water

1 cup tomato juice and pulp

1 teaspoon onion juice

Melt the fat. Add the seasoning; gradually the liquid. Add the vegetables.

Cook 20 minutes. Serve very hot. This is an especially good way of adding the necessary flavor to lentils.

FISH AND VEGETABLE CHOWDER

3 lbs. fish

2 cups diced potatoes

⅓ cup chopped onion

½ cup chopped salt pork

1 teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon cayenne

1 cup peas

2 cups cold water

2 tablespoons fat

2 tablespoons flour

1 cup diced carrots

1 pint scalded milk

Cut fish into small pieces. Cover bones, fins and head with cold water. Simmer 15 minutes; strain. Cook onion and salt pork until brown.

In kettle place layers of fish and mixed vegetables. To water in which bones, etc., have been cooked, add the seasonings. Mix all ingredients. Cook forty minutes, slowly, covered.

LENTILS WITH RICE AND TOMATOES

¾ cup lentils

1 cup rice

1 quart tomatoes

1 teaspoon Worcestershire

2 teaspoons salt

¼ teaspoon cayenne

¼ teaspoon bay leaf

¼ teaspoon sage

Soak lentils over night; drain; add one quart fresh water and one teaspoon of salt. Cook slowly until tender. Add other ingredients. Steam or bake for 45 minutes.

CREAM OF CARROT SOUP

2 cups diced carrots

2 cups water

1 cup milk

⅛ teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons fat

2 tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon salt

Cook the carrots in the water until tender. Melt the fat, add dry ingredients, add gradually the 1 cup water in which the carrots were cooked and the milk. When at boiling point, serve with a little grated [pg 108] raw carrot sprinkled over top of soup. Any vegetable, raw or cooked, may be used in the same way, as cauliflower, cabbage, peas, turnips, etc.

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018