Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: rural areas

Survivalist: Living In The Boonies

Kevin Felts on a hiking trip

Is it possible to live too far in the boonies? Yes is it. There comes a point where it is not feasible to live in a rural area, and find gainful employment. There also comes a point where high speed internet ends. Believe it or not, not even dial-up is not available in all areas.

Let’s call this line, “Living on the edge of modern civilization.”

I may live in the sticks, but there are some who live further in the boonies than I do. If I drive several miles past my home, there are some people barely have access to electricity, much less internet. Water is from a well, while sewage is handled with a septic tank.

For the people who live past the edge of modern civilization, it takes them around hour to drive to work. This means the round trip is almost two hours. That is at least 10 hours a day dedicated to work.

As much as someone would love to live without money, it just is not possible. We all have to pay taxes, especially property taxes. Do not pay your taxes, and the county takes your property. This means having a job and distance to the job must be figured into our survival plans.

Living Near a Hunting Lease

Zoey and Ellis dogs

Some of you may ask, “What is a hunting lease?” It is where a group of people lease land from someone, like a timber company, for the purpose of hunting on the land.

Leasing land is nothing new. We have historical documents dating back to the medieval ages that talk about leasing land. In the book Life in a Medieval Village by Frances and Joseph Gies the authors talk about how people leased land for grazing livestock. My grandfather leased land from a local timber company back in the 1950s and 1960s to graze cattle on.

When someone leases land, they have access and use of the land for a certain amount of time. Here in Southeast Texas, a lot of land is leased from the timber companies to hunt on.

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018