Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: raising livestock

Random Thoughts January 27 2013

The nation is screwed, and I mean royally screwed.

National Debt

The government is so far into debt, there is no way future generations can pay off the debt. As of the posting of this article the US Government is $16.4 trillion in debt. With credit card debt and student loan debt, we owe more like $58 trillion.Kevin Felts, blogger and survivalist

We are throwing millions of dollars to illegal immigrants. Between 2009 and 2011 we spent around $91 million on health care for illegal immigrants.

Social Security disability is expected to go bankrupt by 2016.

Congress is looking for ways to allow millions of illegal immigrants to become citizens.

Long Term Survival Project for 2013

Every year I try to focus on some kind of project that would improve my long term survival plans.

2008 – Hurricane Ike
2009 – random stuff, such as backpacking
2010 – gardening and camping
2011 – juglines and trotlines, storing food in mylar bags
2012 – chickens and chicken coop
2013 – I am thinking rabbits

The last time I had rabbits was in 1998, 1999. My wife and I built 4 or 5 cages in the backyard next to the house. Somehow something got into the cage and killed the rabbits. The next cage I build is going to be a lot more secure then the last one I built.

Before 1998, 1999 the previous time I had rabbits was in the late 1980s, 1988, 1989. The 1980s seem so long ago.

What are the rabbits going to be used for

What survivalist can learn from the chicken of tomorrow project

From wikipedia – The Chicken of Tomorrow is a 1948 documentary short film about advances in chicken and egg farming. This mini-documentary was narrated by Lowell Thomas and is in the public domain.

The film was mocked in a seventh-season episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000.

The Chicken of Tomorrow deals with poultry farming and egg farming in the mid 1940s. Filmed to educate the public about how poultry and eggs are farmed, it also deals with how advances in genetic engineering and technology produces a larger chicken. Eggs are farmed and kept in industrial incubators, and an equal number of chickens are used for meat and other products. Altogether, this produces more food for less money, and allows people to support local poultry farms without breaking the bank. This is relatively similar to today’s poultry farming despite there now being technological differences.

The chicken of tomorrow should provide some food for thought for survivalist who are raising chickens. Do you want a flock of skinny chicken for your family? Or do you want types of chickens that have plump full breast and will lay plenty of eggs?

Do you want chickens that are slow growers and susceptible to disease? Or do you want chickens that mature quickly, lay good quality eggs, have a nice thick breast and resistant to disease?

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