Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: prepping

Hurricane Season and Disaster Preparedness Plans

Hand crank powered flashlight at the bug out location

June 1 starts off the 2009 Hurricane season. For those of you that live in areas that might be affected by a hurricane, now is the time to make sure your plans and supplies are in place. Lets just review some basic disaster preparedness plans.

Have a primary and a backup evacuation route. This includes everything from interstate highways to country back roads. Drive these roads every once in awhile – check on construction zones and slow areas. If the traffic is slow during rush hour, its going to be at a dead stop (or barely moving) during an evacuation.

Have enough food and water for double to triple the number of people in your house right now, for at least 1 week (7 days). If you live 100+ miles inland, you might have to receive friends or family members that are evacuating from the coastal area. Do not depend on evacuees to bring their own food – most do – some don’t.

Where Would You Go if SHTF?

sea rim state park

If you and your family had to evacuate, where would you go? Part of the answer also depends on the situation, needs of the family members and type of disaster.

Shelter in place or leave? There are many factors should help determine where there is a real need to evacuate, or whether the family unit can shelter in place.

Lets take the example of a hurricane. In September of 2008 Hurricane Ike made landfall in the Galveston, Texas area. The storm surge 100 miles to the east drove 10 feet of water 20 miles inland. The only cities there were protected from the surge were the ones that had a barrier built around them.

One of the things that saved Groves, Texas from flooding was the barrier around Port Arthur. Bridge City on the other hand received several feet of water. Out of the hundreds of houses in Bridge city, only around a dozen did not receive some kind of damage from flood waters.

Even though Hurricane Ike made landfall 100 miles to the west of the Beaumont, Bridge City, Port Arthur and Orange area, if a family lived just above sea level there was a real need to evacuate.

Sometimes an evacuation means just moving to higher ground, sometimes it means leaving to area and traveling over 100 miles. But anytime a family unit leaves their house, there is the question of where are they going to go?

Prepping Plans for 2009

Overlooking the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas

As I look back 0n 2008, I also look forward to 2009.

Over the past few months I have not been my usual self. Korey (my son) got a deer this hunting season, and so far that is all we have gotten is that one deer. Tomorrow is the last day of regular deer season, in 2 weeks there is a youth weekend. Hopefully between tomorrow and the youth weekend Korey or I will be able to get another deer. This will fill our freezer for the coming year.

January – my wife and I planted a bed of onions. I bought the onion sprouts 2 weeks ago but have not felt like planting them. The onions were a mix of 10-15Y and some smaller green onions for salads and baked potatoes.

10-15Y are a large onion developed by Texas A&M. When the bulb is ready to be harvested, it will be about the size of a baseball. These onions have a sweet taste and are good for putting on hamburgers.

February – Potatoes go in the ground around February 14th. My wife and I already have to seed potatoes in the shed.

This is also one of the months that I like to go camping.

Plant a couple of apple and peach trees.

Tips on How to Bury a Cache Tube

Sometime around 1998, some of my buddies built a cache tube, and filled it with various items. Some of the items in the cache tubes were magazines, ammunition and a Ruger mini-30.

Green PVC is better then white. The green stuff has a life expectancy of around 800 years, buried and full of sewage. Yep, that last part is correct, the green stuff is sewage pipe. So be sure to get it new and not used.

One end cap does not need to be glued on. To make that seal, use heavy duty water proof wheel bearing grease for boat trailers. Boat trailer wheel bearing grease is designed to be submerged in water. Spread it around the outside of the pipe on the end that the cap will not be glued on. Spread it on thick, as the cap goes on it will push the extra in front of the cap, building up a bead of grease.

The end cap that is not glued on, you will have to have some kind of vent hole, or the caps will not stay on, the compressed air will push the caps back off. Use something like a 3/32 drill bit to drill the vent hole, then plug with water proof, heavy duty wheel bearing grease.

The First 72 Hours After a Disaster

Cooking at the bug out location

This past July 4th weekend my family and I spent 3 days at the camp. This “3 days” is important – the gubberment says that after a disaster you can expect at least 72 hours before relief services are put into place.

While my kids were busy playing in the creek and shooting fireworks, I was thinking of the situation we were in. Even though this was an enjoyable weekend and everyone had fun, there were some serious situations that needed to be considered.

Infant Formula / baby food

My step daughter got pregnant 4 months ago while she was breastfeeding her first child – Joe. Joe is a fine young man who is 9 months old. After Kandi got pregnant with her second child, her breast milk dried up, forcing Joe to eat to artificial food.

While we were at the camp Kandi ran out of powdered formula. Its no big deal, we just drove the 15 – 20 miles back to town. On the flip side, what if we could not make the trip? What if there was no store with baby food stocks?

The Survivalist and Their Bug Out Bag

Bugging out to the wilderness

One of the popular “survival” plans is the “Bug Out Bag” (aka BOB). Members of the survival community that use the Bug out bag, and a “head to the hills” philosophy are sometimes called backpack survivalist.

The “backpack survivalist” is a person who plans on leaving their home either ahead of a disaster or during the disaster, depending on the situation.

The Survivalist, with their Bug Out Bag and family in tow, will head to some parcel of wilderness. Usually the plans include using national forest land as the retreat, areas close to large lakes where camp grounds already exist or maybe even public hunting land. When discussing these plans in detail with other survivalist, usually, exact details have not been thought out.

Example of a bug out plan: A few years ago one survivalist was talking about his plans, which included driving about 14 – 18 hours (normal drive time), across two states in order to reach a large US national park. Exact details such as refueling stops, rest areas and actual camping grounds had not been planned out. The story sounded more like a mix between the Boy Scouts and a Rambo movie.

The survivalist plans for a bug out usually goes something like this:

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018