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Tag: prepping for shtf

What Kind of Disaster Are You Prepping For

Shooting AK-47 with ERGO Grip SUREGRIP

There is an interesting thread in the forum that got me to thinking; that thread is what are you truly prepping for? What kind of disaster are you preparing for? Are you prepping for an outbreak of a new disease, long term civil unrest, nuclear war,,, or something else?

My personal opinion, as long as you and your family are prepping, at least you are going in the right direction. The difference is the degree of readiness.

I can not tell you what to prep for. All I can do is tell you how my family and I are prepping.

My long term survival plans include food production, safe drinking water and property protection.

Food Production

During the Black Death of 1348 – 1350 starvation probably killed as many people as the bubonic plague. Modern society is based on farms and modern transportation. Where would our grocery stores be without trucks, fuel and highways?

What Defines a Survivalist

Earlier today (August 7, 2012) someone started posting rude comments on the Survivalist Boards facebook page. The comments were along the lines if someone lives off the grid, or eats processed food,,,, general stuff like that. I removed the comments and blocked the person. Keep in mind, I rarely, and I mean rarely ever remove comments, much less block anyone.

There seems to be a mindset that survivalist should live in a bunker, or off in a remote mountain range somewhere.

Lets say someone lives in a bunker with complete solar power, grows all of their food, or lives in a cave off in the mountains somewhere, how is that person supposed to function in modern society?

I can not imagine having a birthday party in a bomb shelter. All of the parents having to climb into the shelter, all the kids singing happy birthday,,, much less the OPSEC of inviting a group of people into the shelter.

Sure there was once a time when people lived on small farms. But even on small family farms, people still had to buy or trade for resources. How are people supposed to find salt, flour, sugar, leather, raw metal, plows, anvils, hammers, nails,,, on a family farm?

Sustainable Food Sources After SHTF / TEOTWAWKI

Raising pigs for SHTF

What are your plans for a sustainable food source after SHTF / TEOTWAWKI? In other words, what are your food sources going to be during a long term disaster? Lets define long term as a disaster lasting at least 6 months. This could be a new disease, long term civil unrest, nuclear war, financial collapse,,, something that disrupts modern society.

This article will attempt to divide gathering food during a long term disaster into 3 categories: foraging, growing or raising food, and a combination of the two.

Foraging

For this article, foraging is defined as hunting, fishing, trapping, picking berries, digging roots,,,. Anything having to do with the collection of wild growing plants and animals.

Every year a buddy of mine and I spend three days camping on the Angelina River close to Jasper Texas. During those three days we go fishing, look for food, scout for wildlife,,, just try to put our Bug Out to the Wilderness skills to the test.

In a real life, most people that bug out to the wilderness will probably end up starving to death. Or, will be driven back to society in the search for food. That is if the person does not contract some kind of waterborne disease and die of dysentery.

Doom and Gloom in the Survival Community

Kevin Felts, blogger and political commentator

For the past 20 years I have considered myself active in the survival community. Whether it was listening to talk radio, buying American survival guide magazines, going to gun shows and talking to people, there always seemed to be a level of doom and gloom.

Doom and gloom seemed to be everywhere in the 1990s, in magazines, in books, on the radio,,,. People were talking about how NAFTA was going to abolish the U.S. as a sovereign nation, how the United Nations was going to invade the U.S., how the new world order was going to use the Y2K event to usher in a new era.

There for a decade it was just one thing after another, after another, after another.

After a couple of decades of hearing the same thing over and over like a broke radio, you start to get a little numb to it.

Related ArticleDoom and Gloom in the survival community

New Survivalist Acronym World Without Machines

Saturday afternoon my dad and I made a trip to the camp to work on the tractor. As luck would have it, we needed a small hammer that was in a shed on the other side of the property. Dad gets in his truck to drive over and get the hammer. while dad was getting the hammer, I looked at the tractor and did some deep thinking about how dependent humans are on machines. Between the truck and the tractor, we have the foundations of modern society.

Without machines, we would not be able to plant tens of thousands of acres of land, would not be able to harvest corn or wheat, would not be able to transport livestock, would not be able to transport fertilizer to the farms, would not be able to transport crops to market, nor would we be able to drive to the market to buy the food.

Every part of our modern lifestyle is affected by machinery in one way or another.

Because machines are so vital to our modern lifestyle, I think we need to use the acronym World Without Machines (WWM) as often as we use SHTF, TEOTWAWKI, WROL (without rule or law),,, and so on.

Prepping is a never ending process

In the 1990s my prepping plans included stockpiling rice, beans, ammunition and plans to bug out to the camp (my grandparents farm). From there my family and I were going to live off the land.

Times change, plans change.

My plans went from stockpiling mostly rice and beans, to stockpiling canned foods, #10 cans of freeze dried foods, planting fruit trees, food stored in mylar bags, stockpiling seeds, and having a chicken coop that can be loaded on a trailer and brought to the bug out location.

Without safe drinking water life as we know it can not exist. Because of that fact my family and I plan on driving a new water well.

Plans changed from cooking over an open fire, to building a bar-b-q pit large enough to cook a whole hog on. Hopefully the pit can act as a smoker, as well as a cooker.

Food Fatigue After SHTF / TEOTWAWKI

Stockpiling food for SHTF / teotwawki

Food fatigue = eating the same thing over, and over, and over, and over,,,. Eventually leads to vitamin and mineral deficiencies; extreme cases of malnutrition can lead to death. Food fatigue, vitamin and mineral deficiencies go hand in hand.

Couple of examples:

Pellagra – vitamin deficiency caused by a lack of niacin. Seen in people who eat a diet of mostly corn based products.

Scurvy – caused by long term vitamin C deficiency.

Eat the same thing over and over and over,,, everyday, people develop food fatigue. When people get fatigued, they stop eating. When people stop eating, they starve and eventually die.

How do we prevent food fatigue? We stockpile a range of assorted foods, and we have a source of fresh food.

Lets say that some kind of long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation happens, what are your plans to ward off food fatigue? Are you stockpiling a wide range of foods? What are your sources of fresh food? What are your renewable food sources?

Stockpiling Food

Obsessed With Survivalism

Kevin Felts at the Angelina River

Have you ever met someone that is obsessed with prepping or survivalism? They keep their Get Home Bag ready to go, their Bug Out Bag is prepped and ready to go, keep a firearm in every room of the house,,, to the point where survivalism has consumed their lives. Would that be survivalism, an obsession or paranoia?

There is a fine line between a hobby and an obsession. If that is true, is there a line between a lifestyle and an obsession? What about a hobby and a lifestyle?

If we do the same thing everyday for 10, 20, 30 or even 40 years, would that be considered an obsession? If so, is work an obsession? Sometimes yea, work can be an obsession. Other times work is something we do to live.

If someone practices survivalism for 10, 20, 30,,, years, would that be a lifestyle or an obsession?

Maybe the deciding factor is how much survivalism affects our everyday life. Are we able to have normal relationships, are we able to live our lives as normal as possible while maintaining a dedicated survivalist lifestyle?

There needs to be a balance between prepping and living life as normal as possible.

Trip to the Bug Out Location June 2012

Cleaning up at the Bug Out Location

Man oh man, what a weekend. In a previous article we talked about survivalism as an experience and not a theory. Part of my prepping for SHTF / TEOTWAWKI includes going to the Bug Out Location for a couple of days, taking notes, figuring out what needs to be changed, and going from there.

Its one thing to say, “if the crap hits the fan, this is what I am going to do,,,,”.

Its another thing to put those plans to the test on a regular, or at the very least a semi-regular basis.

In this article we are going to be discussing my observations from the June 30 – July 1 trip. Feel free to share your questions and/or comments.

On Saturday, June 30, 2012 my wife and I loaded up the Tahoe with basic gear, and headed to the Bug Out Location. Some of the stuff we packed included change of clothes, food, ammunition, firearms,, drinks, laptop, cell phone,,, just your basic stuff.

A few hours after arriving at the camp, my wife and I were joined my a buddy of mine, his wife, and their daughter.

Safe Drinking Water

Self-Centered Preppers

For this article, the term “Self-Centered Preppers” means people who only think of themselves while preparing for TEOTWAWKI. All they are concerned about is themselves, and “maybe” their close family. No consideration goes into planning for friends, or anyone outside their immediate family members.

A prime example of Self-Centered Preppers might be people who plan on bugging out to the wilderness. How is your family going to deal with the sudden isolation? How are you going to deal with being cut off from friends and family members? How are your friends and family members going to handle a sudden loose of contact with you and your family?

If humanity were to suffer some kind of long term SHTF situation, my family would turn to people such as my dad, and myself for guidance. It is my resp0onsiblity to make sure my family has plenty to eat, protected and that they will be provided of.

Self-Centered Prepper does not care about anyone else. What about your grand kids? What about your kids that can not afford to stockpile food at this time? What about your parents, brothers, sisters, close cousins,,,,?

Friendships are an asset

Why Do People Get Into Prepping

Kevin Felts, survivalist and bloggerWhy do people get into prepping?

I think it boils down to “Hope for the best but prepare for the worst”.

The question that begs to be answered is “what is the the worst?”. What is the worst case situation that we should prepare for?

For some people “the worst” might be losing their job. For others it might be a wildfire, for others it might be a hurricane or flood. Then there are the people that plan for a complete collapse of society.

Does being a survivalist mean you have to prep for a complete collapse? No, it does not.

To understand survivalism, we need to understand what drives a survivalist. One of the highest levels of human thought is to think about what we think about. Why do we do the things we do, why do we think about what we do, why do we act a certain way, why do we make certain decisions.

Nobody is born a survivalist. Joining the survival community is a conscious decision we make. As with everything else in life, our decisions are influenced by the way we were raised, culture, society, events in our life,,,.

Why do people get into coin collecting? Why do people get into stamp collecting? Why do people get into the hobbies they do? Do they find the hobbies challenging, maybe a way to occupy their free time?

Survivalism is a practical hobby. Grow your own food, preserve and store your own food, just like people used to do decades ago. Maybe survivalism should be considered as a return to basics?

There was once a time when people grew their food during the spring and summer. Then preserved the food to last the family through the winter.

Today, families keep just a few days of food on hand.

Welfare roaches after a disaster

When you have 2 and 3 generations of a family on government benefits, people grow up “thinking” that is how they are supposed to live.

I know a certain family first hand, the mom has 5 or 6 kids, she does not work, and the dad makes barely above minimum wage. The family has been drawing food stamps for close to 20 years. One of the kids is in her mid 20s and works. Another girl is around 19 years old. Think about that. The 20 year old was raised on food stamps from birth all the way until she became an adult. And now, the 20 year is pregnant, has no education, and does not work.

The 19 year old claims she is bipolar and is disabled. Guess what, the government signed off on it, and she draws a monthly disability check. What the hell is that? How can someone capable of working able to draw disability?

With the Hurricane Katrina people at the shelter, I saw a lot of young pregnant ladies, whos baby daddy would not work. The mom and baby bring in food stamps and whatever else they can get, and the baby daddy is along for the ride.

Prepping For SHTF in the Wrong Order

After talking to a buddy of mine, we came to the realization that most preppers stockpile in the wrong order.

When people get into prepping, what is the first things they start stockpiling? Most people lean towards stockpiling firearms and ammunition first.

Why do most people place buying a firearm at the top of their list? Maybe its the sense of security that owning a firearm provides? Maybe its the idea of the family being able to protect themselves? Maybe its a primal feeling where we feel safe and secure with a spear in our hands?

Ok, lets get back to prepping.

This is the way most people prep

1. Firearms

2. Short term food preps

3. Sustainable food preps

This is the way people should prep

1. Sustainable food preps

2. Short term food preps

3. Firearms

Sustainable Food Preps

Survivalism as an Experience and Not a Theory

camping hiking backpacking

Knowledge + experience = skill

It is only through experience that we further our knowledge.

Knowledge and experience are stepping stones that build upon each other.

One problem that survivalist face, is the lack of hands on experience. You may “think” you know how to do something, but until you actually do it, you do not know if your theory works.

Some people learn the theories of survivalism, but never take the time to test those theories. How do you test your theories? With experience. How do you get experience? Buy doing something.

Through knowledge we develop a theory of how we can survive a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation. How do we know the theory is going to work? By testing the theory.

Related Article3 day camping trip on the Angelina River

Hunting after SHTF / TEOTWAWKI theory

Over the past 20 years I have heard the same story probably 1,000 or more times – “if SHTF, I am going to bug out to the wilderness and live off the land”. Then the person starts talking about hunting small game, how they have X number of 22 long rifle, and how they should be able to get X number of squirrels or rabbits with X number of rounds. After you hear the same story hundreds of times, it gets rather repetitive.

The first questions I have, how often does the person go hunting? How often do they load up their gear and head out to the wilderness for 3 or 4 days to test their plans? Has the person ever skinned a squirrel or rabbit, much less cooked and ate one?

Then there is the big question, where are you going to hunt at? Do you have access to land? Do you have access to remote land, or private property so other people will not intrude?

Stockpiling 22 Long Rifle For SHTF

Stockpiling ammunition for SHTF

When stockpiling 22 long rifle for SHTF, what other ammo can you buy 500 rounds of for less then $20? Just a few years ago a brick of 550 rounds cost in the $10 – $11 price range. I wish I would have bought several cases 5 years ago, it would have saved me a lot of money.

No other type of ammunition is more practical to stockpile then the good ole 22 long rifle. One reason why the 22 long rifle is so popular today, is that during the great depression, 22 long rifle is all people could afford to buy.

  • 22 long rifle is cheap
  • It stores well
  • Low report
  • Low recoil
  • Anyone in the family can shoot it
  • Rifles do not cost a fortune
  • Works in rifles and pistols
  • Effective on small game
  • Does not cause excessive damage to the animals
  • Report does not scare livestock

What more could someone want?

How much 22 Long Rifle To Stockpile

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