Homesteading and Survivalism

Living a simple life

Tag: personal security

Looters will overrun your Bug Out Location

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Think your Bug Out Location is safe? Think again. Looters will overrun your camp, kill you and your family, take your supplies and there is little you can do about it.

The difference between you and the looters, after they win the war in the cities, the looters will head to the countryside looking for food. The survivors from the cities will be battle hardened, have an idea of what they are doing, and will make short work of your defenses.

How many survivalist gets hands on training on using their weapons? How many people in your group have combat experience?

There is a difference in tactical shooting experience, and combat experience.

A lot of people thinking going out to the range and shooting paper targets will prepare them for when the crap hits the fan.

This video got me to thinking about the whole looter worse case situation.

MAINEPREPPER is right on target. I know for a fact that I do not get enough trigger time, and there is no excuse for that.

Over the past 2 – 3 years I have got a lot of my preps in order – #10 cans, food in mylar bags, chickens,,,.

The time has come to get some trigger time in.

One of the problems I see with preppers, they usually buy cheaply made products. This come from the buy it cheap and stack it deep mindset.

When it comes time to buy an AR15, a lot of people put price first, quality second. When you need that rifle, you are going to wish you had bought for quality. Do you “really” want to use the cheapest rifle you can find to protect your family?

Then after people buy the cheapest rifle they can find, they stockpile the cheapest ammunition they can find. People that buy cheap and stack deep have to deal with 2 cheaply made components, and hope” things work well in the end.

Post your comments in this forum thread – Preppers are going to die

Locking the doors

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survivalistOver the past few months I have gotten in the habit of locking the doors during the day.  The doors have always been locked at night.  But here lately I have been keeping the doors locked during the middle of the day.

Security is not a serious concern during the day.  My wife and I live in a low crime rate area.  There is rarely, if ever, a serious crime around here.

The doors are locked to set a boundary line between my wife and I, and the rest of the world.

Boundaries are an important part of life.  Even though millions of illegal immigrants do not care about boundaries, that does not mean the rest of us do not give a crap.

We face boundaries everyday.  Think about the boundaries we face on a daily basis.  There are boundaries on the road, at the job, in relationships, while shopping,,, everything we do is somehow limited by a boundary.

So why shouldn’t my front door be a well defined boundary line?

An unlocked door is like a yield sign.

A locked door is like a stop sign, as a locked door forces people on the outside to stop.

Yield signs only work when the other party respects the sign.  Awhile back my wife and I had an issue with our kids walking into our house without knocking. If my wife and I decide to bury the bone in the middle of the living room floor, we should not be interrupted by someone walking in the front door. This is our home, nobody has the right to walk into my home without our permission.

Locking the doors forces those on the outside to respect a boundary line.

For people who refuse to respect a yield sign, lock the door. That forces them to stop, knock and then ask permission to enter the home.

The locked doors provides a sense of security.  Locking the door says that this is my home, and you “will not” just walk in without my permission.

A locked door is like a fence line.  The door defines a boundary line between my safe and secure area, and the rest of the world.

Missing gear from bug out location

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survivalist camp bug out locationYou know what really sucks, is when your trying to stockpile survival gear at the bug out location, and stuff keeps coming up missing. Awhile back the liner of my parka went missing, pair of cold weather gloves, shotgun shells, and now some lithium batteries and a LED flashlight are missing.

Its not that someone is breaking into the location and stealing the stuff, I think its more along the lines of someone “borrowing” the supplies and not bringing it back or replacing it.

Over the past 15+ years, I have been making it a point to keep certain types of survival gear at the bug out location. Whether its blankets, flashlights, knives, ammo, first aid supplies, water filter, hand tools, eating utensils,,,,,, I like to keep a general stockpile of gear at the camp. I don’t know how much time and money has been invested over the past decade alone to make sure we have plenty of survival gear for some kind of SHTF situation.

This last couple of items that went missing were nothing more then an $18 led flashlight, and some energizer lithium batteries. In all, the 2 items cost about $30. Thirty dollars is nothing to really worry about, as long as “someone” is getting use out of them. Its the fact that I put the gear at the camp for a certain reason, and now the stuff is missing.

A few months ago 2 of my kids and I went to the camp and spent the night. Sometime around 9pm or so we decided to go for a walk around the property. It was at that point that I realized that I had forgotten a good flashlight. All I had was the tactical light on the front of my AR-15, and all the kids had were some hand crank flashlights. Hand crank are good for inside the house. When you need to light up a 10 acre field, hand crank lights just do not cut it.

Lesson learned, we needed some good led flashlights at the camp. So I bought one as a test with the intent of leaving it at the camp full time.

In 2010 the shed at the camp was broke into and some tools were stolen. Some of the missing items included a Stihl chainsaw, pipe wrench, and various hand tools. As financial times get tougher, petty crime, and crimes of opportunity goes up. What this means, if someone pulls into a gas station, leaves something on the front seat where its visible, the item is likely to be stolen. If you make it easy for criminals to steal stuff, its gonna get taken.

Lets go back to the missing gear at the bug out location / aka “camp”. Since several of my family members go to the camp, I might start putting stuff out of sight and out of mind. Instead of leaving the flashlights and batteries in the bar where they can be seen, I might set some shelves up in a bedroom closet and put my gear out of sight.

Now for a video about a bug out exercise on Labor Day of 2010. Labor day was used to test my families bug out plans.

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