Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: peace and quiet

June 2018 Fishing Trip on the Angelina River – A Short Story

Southeast Texas alligator

The day started a little earlier than others when the alarm went off at 5:00 am. As soon as the alarm went off a war of attrition began in my head. One voice was talking about how comfortable the bed was and to forget about the fishing trip. The other voice was telling me to get up and go because in a few weeks the full brunt of the Texas heat will be here.

Realizing in another three or four weeks the July heat wave will be upon us, I decided to crawl (though reluctantly) out of bed and head to the shower. There is something refreshing about getting a morning shower.

Attire for the day was Levis jeans, green Carhart shirt, and Justin leather work boots. Typically, I wear shorts and sneakers on fishing trips, but this trip was different. Part of this trip was for pictures and videos. Rather than walking through a swampy area with sneakers, to decided to wear boots.

All of the gear had been loaded in either the Toyota T100 truck, or in the Weldbilt aluminum boat the night before. All that needed to be done was take a shower, get dressed, grab my everyday carry gear, and head out the door. I had wanted to leave the house around 5:30, but was able to leave around 5:20 or so.

Driving to the Angelina River

The Peace and Quiet of Nature Photography

Bee Tree slough on the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas

For some people nature photography is going somewhere, taking pictures, and the go back home.

My personal feelings on nature photography and nature in general, people and nature have a special connection that has been forgotten. Up until around 10,000 years ago humans were hunter-gatherers. We followed the herds and were in tune with nature. However, all of that changed as the last ice age ended.

As the curtains drew closed on the last ice age, the large animals that supports our ancestors died off. A great number of animals even went extinct. Probably as a result of the mass extinctions, our ancestors turned to farming and gardening. Rather than following herds, our ancestors domesticated various animals, such as the goat, sheep, chicken… etc. Rather than foraging for wild edibles, crops were cultivated.

In the grand scheme of human history, we have a hundreds of thousands of years as hunter-gatherers, and 10,000 years of town and city building. In the grand scheme of human history, cities have been around for the blink of an eye. The rest of our history was sent in sparse communities, and as hunter-gatherers.

Nature Photography, Peace and Quiet

Using A Pocket Compass While Hiking With The Dogs

Dogs on a hiking trip

Awhile back we talked about a 50 cent pocket compass I ordered off Ebay. Rather than buying the compass from an online store, just go straight to the source and cut out the middle man.

Paracord zipper pulls were added to my packs, and then the compass was attached to the paracord. Is the pocket compass a primary land navigation aid? Of course not. The pocket compass is used in conjunction with other navigation aids.

For example, while on a recent hiking trip with the dogs we stopped next to a nice pool of water to take a break. While the dogs were playing, I looked at the pocket compass to make sure we were headed in the right direction.

I know the area and there was no way we could have become lost. A pipeline passes through the forest just a few hundred yards from where the dogs and I stopped. Then there is a dirt road that bisects the pipeline. No matter which way we headed, we would hit either the road or the pipeline, as long as we traveled in a straight line.

Using a Pocket Compass

My Theory On Why Americans Are So Violent

Overlooking the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas

Here is my theory on why Americans are so violent, and its not that we love violence. When given the chance, most people pick peace and quiet over violence.

If we prefer peace over violence, why do so many people prone to violence?

My opinion, there are two factors that promote violence in our society:

1, The lack of upward mobility.

2, Violence is a learned social behavior.

There is an article on Live Science saying Murder May Spread Like Infectious Disease. That article discusses a couple of important factors, one factor says that murders are more likely to be committed in low income neighborhoods.

If you track murder like a disease, it spreads and burns itself out. But if you look at the tracking on a map, higher income areas have a lower murder rate then lower income areas.

The Natural State Of Mankind

Tackle box in a boat while on a fishing trip

The way people live in cities, all bunched up together like chickens in a coop is not the natural state of mankind.

For tens of thousands of years mankind lived in small nomadic groups. They had land to farm, land to roam, river and streams to fish from, land to hunt on and land to migrate on. Groups traded between each other, and were pretty much self sufficient.

Today, we live in cities that group people together like livestock.

What happens when you put too many chickens in a coop? They start pecking at each other. Let the chickens out in the yard, or free range, and they are fine.

Humans are natural born predators; we fish, we hunt and we eat. Living in cities with our artificial grocery stores suppresses those natural predator feelings.

Like chickens going to a feeder, or hogs going to a feed trough, so people go to the local grocery store or fast food place and get their food.

Easily Food Breeds Laziness and Obesity

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018