Entries Tagged ‘oats’

OATMEAL PANCAKES

2 cups oatmeal

1 tablespoon melted fat

⅛ teaspoon salt

Add:

1 egg beaten into a cupful of milk

1 cupful flour into which has been sifted 1 teaspoonful baking powder.

Beat well. Cook on a griddle. This is an excellent way to use left-over oatmeal.

ROLLED OATS RAGGED ROBINS

1½ cups rolled oats

1 cup bread flour

1⅓ teaspoons salt

1⅓ cups milk

2½ teaspoons cream of tartar

4 tablespoons fat

1¼ teaspoons soda

Sift dry ingredients. Cut in the fat.

Add liquid and drop by spoonfuls on greased baking sheet.

Bake in hot oven 12 to 15 minutes. These may be rolled and cut same as baking powder biscuits.

(If uncooked rolled oats are used, allow to stand in the milk for 30 minutes before making recipe.)

OATMEAL MUFFINS

1⅓ cups flour

2 tablespoons molasses

½ teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons fat

3 teaspoons baking powder

1 egg beaten

½ cup milk

1 cup cooked oatmeal

Sift dry ingredients. Add egg and milk. Add fat and cereal. Beat well.

Bake in greased tins 20 minutes.

OATMEAL SCONES

1 cup cold porridge (stiff)

1 cup boiling water

1 tablespoon fat

½ teaspoon baking powder or ¼ teaspoon soda

1 teaspoon corn syrup

½ teaspoon salt

Mix soda, boiling water and fat. Mix all.

Turn on board.

Mould flat—cut ¼-inch thick and bake on griddle.

OATMEAL NUT BREAD

1 cake compressed yeast

2 cups boiling water

1½ cup lukewarm water

2 cups rolled oats

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup brown sugar or 2 tablespoons corn syrup

2 tablespoons fat

4 cups flour

½ cup chopped nuts.

Pour two cups of boiling water over oatmeal, cover and let stand until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast and sugar in one-half cup lukewarm water, add shortening and add this to the oatmeal and water. Add one cup of flour, or enough to make an ordinary sponge. Beat well. Cover and set aside in a moderately warm place to rise for one hour.

Add enough flour to make a dough—about three cups, add nuts and the salt. Knead well. Place in greased bowl, cover and let rise in a moderately warm place until double in bulk—about one and one-half hour. Mould into loaves, fill well-greased pans half full, cover and let rise again one hour. Bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

OATMEAL BREAD

2 cups rolled oats

2 cups boiling water

⅓ cup molasses

1 yeast cake

¾ cup lukewarm water

1 tablespoon salt

2 tablespoons fat (melted)

About 6 cups bread flour

Scald the rolled oats with the boiling water and let stand until cool.

Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm water and add to the first mixture when cool.

Add the molasses, salt and melted fat. Stir in enough bread flour to knead.

Turn on a floured board. Knead lightly. Return to bowl and let rise until double in bulk.

Knead and shape in loaves and let rise until double again.

Bake in a moderate oven 45 minutes.

COOKED OATMEAL BREAD

3 cups thick cooked oatmeal

2 tablespoons fat

1½ tablespoons salt

3 tablespoons molasses

1½ cakes yeast

¾ cup lukewarm water

About 5 cups flour

To oatmeal add the sugar, salt and fat.

Mix the yeast cake with the lukewarm water, add it to the other materials and stir in the flour until the dough will not stick to the sides of the bowl.

Knead until elastic, ten to fifteen minutes, moisten the top of the dough with a little water to prevent a hard crust forming, and set to rise in a warm place.

When double its bulk, knead again for a few minutes. Shape into loaves and put into greased pans. Let rise double in bulk and bake in a moderate oven for about 50 minutes.

Spreading oats and beans at the hunting lease

Hunting season is only 2 months away, and that is for rifle season.  In some areas of the nation, bow season starts the first weekend of October.  The recent droughts have drove up the price of deer corn.  What used to cost $4 – $5 for a 50 pound bag, now cost around $10 – $11 for a 50 pound bag.

A lot of people object to the use of wildlife feeders, or even hunting over a food plot.  If you object to those kinds of hunting tactics, that is fine.  I have no objection to your objection.  Just realize that your objection gives you no special privileges or rights.

My family and I hunt on what is called a pine plantation.  The timber companies cut down oak trees, strip the land, and replant only fast growing hybrid pine trees.  During the stripping process, natural food sources are displaced or even destroyed.  Its sad how our forest are turning into nothing more then pine tree gardens.  A few years ago the local timber company cut down oaks trees that were at least 75 years old, bulldozed the oak trees into a pile and burned them.

Deer are foragers, kinda like goats.  Deer walk around eating weeds, twigs, just about anything they can find.  But there are certain food sources that deer like, such as acorns.  When the timber companies cut, bulldoze and burn oak trees, what are the hunters supposed to hunt over?  We can scout for deer trails, but there is no promise the deer are taking those trails during daylight hours.

In order to replace those lost food sources, hunters will sometimes set up feeders, or plant a food plot.

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Fundamental foods survivalist should stockpile

Chickens eating watermelonWhen survivalist start stockpiling food, we buy #10 cans and usually store food in mylar bags.  Lets say we had to focus on certain foods, what would those foods be?  Lets look at food that packs a nutritional punch, renewable, easy to grow, easy to harvest and can be stored without modern technology.

How do we decide which foods we should focus on?  Lets narrow our selections to how easy the food is to grow, how well it stores, and the nutrition content.

During a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI survival situation, we will being growing and storing our own food.  One thing we do not want to do is dedicate a lot of time and effort into food that contains little nutrition.

In this article I hope to focus on renewable foods.  Foods that we can grow in a home garden or at a Bug Out Location.  During a long term survival situation, people that hope to make it through will need a renewable food source.  It is not enough to stockpile food in mylar bags, or stockpile freeze dried food in #10 cans.  Sooner or later those mylar bags and those cans will be empty.

Honey

Humans have been eating honey for well over 1,000 years.  Some estimates put humans eating honey up to 8,000 years ago.

  • The bees do the work for you, all you have to do is harvest the honey
  • Honey is loaded with trace minerals
  • Honey does not spoil or go rancid
  • Honey inhibits the growth of bacteria, so it can be used in the treatment of wounds and injuries

One of the drawbacks to honey, the bees will sting the crap out of you if you bother the hive. You think your big and bad until a swarm of bees are done with your ass. When its said, done and over with, you will be in a fetal position crying for your mommy.

If you plan on adding honey to your to your preps, either stockpile the crap out of it, or learn how to safely harvest honey.

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