Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: lanterns

Adding Chemlights To Emergency Preps

Chemlights

Question to all the preppers / survivalist out there, do chemlights have a place in your preps? I have a few chemlights, but just a few. Once those are used, I honestly do not know if I will buy anymore. As a tree hugger, it bothers me that chemlights are use once, then throw away. Where do all the used chemlights end up? In the landfill. Why use chemlights when there are so many rechargeable options on the market?

Let’s take a rechargeable LED lantern for example. Once the battery is run down, it can be charged by solar, or by USB, then it is ready to go again.

To me, chemlights are “almost” the same as throwing your money away. You get a few hours of light, and then it is thrown away. Why not get a flashlight or lantern? Both of them are reusable, while a chemlight isn’t.

Are there chemlights in my preps? Sure there are. I just have a difficult time spending money on something that is disposable.

Light Sources After SHTF / TEOTWAWKI

Lanterns after SHTF

Some kind of SHTF/TEOTWAWKI situation has happened, society has broken down, and the power has finally gone off.

Or, some kind of natural disaster has happened, power has been cut off and my not be restored for several days to several weeks. After Hurricane Rita, my family and I spent 18 days without power. So power outages are not reserved for a long term SHTF/teotwawki situation.

My light preps are kerosene, hand crank lights, solar lights and your regular LED lights. Each light source has their own advantages and disadvantages.

Kerosene Lanterns

For over a hundred years kerosene lanterns have been used by mankind in lanterns. Kerosene stores somewhat well, depending on the type of kerosene that is being stored and what the kerosene is going to be used for. Overtime bacteria develops and feeds off the fossil fuel; when this happens the fuel will start to gel.

To get the most out of your kerosene, you may want to consider treating it with a type of diesel fuel treatment that prevents the growth of bacteria.

Kerosene lanterns pose a fire risk, especially around small children.

When my family has to use a kerosene lantern, we place the lantern in a bathroom so the light can reflect off of a mirror, and several inches away from the edge of the counter top.

When picking a lantern, be sure to take the size of the reservoir into consideration. The larger the reservoir, the longer the lantern can operate.

If kerosene is going to be included in your long term SHTF survival plan, keep in mind your kerosene is going to run out sooner-or-later.

Handcrank Lights and Lanterns

Using Kerosene Lanterns After SHTF

kerosene lanterns

Kerosene is one of those things that just does not fit into my survival preps. Since I tend to think about long term survival plans, and kerosene will run out sooner or later, so how does all of that fit together? And then there are the hazard of using kerosene lanterns – fire hazard, health risk from fumes, glass breakage, storing kerosene,,,,. Because of all of this, I have decided to put kerosene into the short – mid term survival plans. In other words, kerosene would probably only be used for a couple of months – or until supplies run out.

On the other hand, I’am thinking of just phasing kerosene out all together – except for very limited plans and supplies. The question your probably asking is “why would you want to phase kerosene out?” The answer – there are too many risk. Why should I use something that poses a fire hazard and children can knock over? Fire + children = do not go together. If a fire and fume risk can be eliminated, then why not?

This is where solar powered lights come into effect. Solar is cheap, its free (besides the initial investment), its renewable, is safe, poses very few fire risk,,,, so why not use it?

On the topic of handcrank flashlights

Lets talk about handcrank flashlights for a little bit. This topic might have been discussed a lot, but its good to have a refresher.

Over the past few years I have been trying to stock up on those hand crank flashlights and lanterns. But instead of having a bunch of them at my home (which I do), I have been bringing some of them to “the camp”.

When my family and I go to the camp, sometimes its after dark when we get there. After we arrive, I will grab a flashlight to go turn on the propane. I do not want to have to worry about dead batteries in the flashlight.

There have been a few time that thunder storms have knocked out power at the camp. I do not like looking around for extra batteries in the dark – especially when we have mouse traps set out.

Its very convent to grab a flashlight, shake or give it a couple of twist, and you have instant light.

Here is one of the issues, it might be 2 – 4 months between trips to the camp. That gives the batteries in the flashlights a long time to go dead.

Also, if you leave those cheap batteries in your flashlights -the ones that leak acid – your gear can be ruined before you know it. Just the other day I found an AM/FM radio that the batteries had leaked in and ruined the device. The radio was a cheap one, so its not a lot of money lost, but it is a piece of equipment that will need to be replaced.

I have heard of long term storage batteries, ones that you can keep stored for decades,,,, but why? I see no real reason to invest in stuff like that. They are going to go dead after you put them in the flashlight anyway.

The crank flashlights make good hand outs to the kids. If the light gets set down and the batteries go dead, just give it a few shakes or twist. This past weekend while on a camping trip with my daughter, I gave her a twist flashlight to keep in her tent with her. I told her to twist the end to charge it up, and she was like “ok, no problem.”

Dyno Powered Devices

Dyno Powered DevicesPlease Rate This Article Back on 08-08-2007, forrestdweller posted an interesting thread on the forum. At the time it did not get very much attention. As I was going through some of the older threads, I took notice of it. Dyno Powered Devices are really underrated and overlooked. As I walk around the […]

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