Rural Lifestyle Blog

Life in Rural America

Tag: flashlights

Thrunite TC12 Flashlight Review

The Thrunite TC12 is unique in that it has a built in battery charger.  Plug in a micro-USB cable to charge the flashlight.  While charging the brightness selector button flashes. Being USB rechargeable makes this is an excellent truck, car or nightstand flashlight design.  Keep the Thrunite TC12 in the console or glove box of the truck.  To charge, simply plug it into a USB charger.   Most people have some kind of cell phone charger in their vehicle.  Use the included cable to charge the light. To review the Thrunite TC12 I did my typical battery of test. starting with the freeze test. Continue Reading….

Thrunite Archer flashlight ultimate test

This is a review of the Thurnite Archer 1A V3 flashlight. Awhile back I did a review of the ThruNite TN12. The TN12 took everything I threw at it and kept working. With this review of the Thrunite Archer I decided up up the game and add some different test. Disclosure: The Thurnite Archer was sent to me at no cost to myself. This will not affect my opinion of the flashlight and hopefully will not affect your opinion. The Archer comes with a lanyard and a heavy duty clip.  I removed the clip for the test.  To get the clip off I had to use a screw driver and pry it off the flashlight housing. Continue Reading….

Surefire 6PX Pro Review

Surefire made a name for itself by manufacturing high quality products, and at an affordable price. The Surefire 6PX Pro raises the bar in the sub $100 flashlight market.Surefire 6PX Pro

Made in USA – Yes
Dual output – Yes, 200/15 lumens. Surefire website says there is a new 320 lumen model.
Momentary no/off – Yes
Lanyard – No
Water resistant – Yes
Water proof – Yes
Battery – 123A
Model – Surefire 6PX-B-BK

Made in USA – Its nice to see a company investing in the nation they are trying to sell their products in. In this case the Surefire 6PX Pro is advertised as being made in the USA.

Dual Output – 200/15 lumens, which makes it nice when you go from looking for firewood around the campsite, to inside a tent.

On a recent hunting trip, I found the 15 lumens just right for following the ATV trail, but not so bright that my nightvision was messed up.

200 lumens provides plenty of light for nighttime operations.

Continue Reading….

Rayovac Indestructible Flashlight Review

Rayovac Indestructible FlashlightThe thing about Rayovac, they have a reputation of low cost, low quality flashlights. When someone ask about a good quality flashlight, what are the first brand names mentioned? Usually its Maglight, Surefire, Fenix,,, but not Rayovac.

From what it appears, Rayovac is trying to improve that market image with its Indestructible line of flashlights. The model I tested on a recent camping trip was the OT3AAA-B.

A couple of weeks ago my wife and I were shopping at the Walmart in Jasper Texas. A buddy of mine and I had a camping trip coming up, so I decided to drop by the sporting goods section to see if there was anything I needed.

Usually I do not bother with Rayovac flashlights, but there was something about the Rayovac Indestructible AAA flashlight that caught my eye. I can tell you straight up it was not the Indestructible name. More like it was the metal housing and dual output that caught my attention.

OT3AAA-B had almost everything I was looking for – AAA batteries, metal housing, dual output. At a cost of less then $20, I decided to go ahead and buy it.

A few days later my buddy and I headed out on our camping trip, which gave me the chance to test the Rayovac OT3AAA-B in a real life setting.

Continue Reading….

Petzl TacTikka 3-LED Headlamp

Discreet lighting preserves night vision with a red filter that covers LEDs and easy transition between red and white lighting with flip filter Lighting level can be adjusted to help conserve battery life.

3 LEDs produce flood beam lighting with a long burn time, up to 120 hours

Compact and lightweight: a single compartment contains both the LED and batteries, and it weight in at only 25 ounces (including batteries) Practical as the beam can be easily aimed where needed, and it features a comfortable and adjustable elastic headband

Specifications:

Weight with batteries: 25 ounces Battery type: 3 AAA Burn time: 120 hours
Red filter made of impact resistant polycarbonate
Water resistant for all-weather use
Operates on 3 AAA/LR03 batteries (included).
Weight : 78 g including batteries
3-year guarantee


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Stockpiling Survival Gear at the Bug Out Location

A few weeks ago my wife and I, and some of our friends, made a trip to the Bug Out Location for the weekend. Spending time at the BOL gives us a chance to test our survival plans, see what works, what does not work and what we need to change.

Every few months I make up a bucket of gear to bring to the Bug Out Location. Sometimes I bring tools, sometimes its flashlights, sometimes its first aid gear, chains for pulling logs,,, and so on.

I want to share with yall what I am putting together for the next load.

Trotline string – cost $4.97 for 580 feet, 235 pound tensile strength. I guess I could order some 550 cord, but that stuff cost around $8 for 100 feet. 550 cord might get added to another shipment.

We need some simple cord for tying stuff up. On the last trip to the camp, the chain that works the flap of the toilet broke. We needed some simple cord to make the flap of the toilet work. My buddy used the cord off my ear plugs to rig the toilet flap where it would work.

Nails – we are in serious need of nails at the camp. I am probably going to buy a tub of 10 penny and 12 penny nails. Not the small box of nails either, but rather a tub of nails.

Worse case situation, some kind of long term event happens, we need to build some kind of shed. Some of us chop a pine tree down, plit it into boards, but guess what, we do not have any nails.

While on the topic of nails, why not add in a couple of hammers and wedges?

Cigarette lighters – not for smoking, but for starting fires.

Even though I have around 2,000 matches at the camp, a lighter provides almost unlimited sparks. I picked up a 5 pack of large Bic lighters just to bring to the Bug Out Location. Continue Reading….

Light after teotwawki

Some kind of SHTF/teotwawki situation has happened, society has broken down, and the power has finally gone off.

Or, some kind of natural disaster has happened, power has been cut off and my not be restored for several days to several weeks. After Hurricane Rita, my family and I spent 18 days without power. So power outages are not reserved for a long term SHTF/teotwawki situation.

My light preps are kerosene, hand crank lights, solar lights and your regular LED lights. Each light source has their own advantages and disadvantages.

Kerosene

Lanterns after SHTFFor over a hundred years kerosene has been used by mankind in lanterns. Kerosene stores somewhat well, depending on the type of kerosene that is being stored and what the kerosene is going to be used for. Overtime bacteria develops and feeds off the fossil fuel; when this happens the fuel will start to gel.

To get the most out of your kerosene, you may want to consider treating it with a type of diesel fuel treatment that prevents the growth of bacteria.

Kerosene lanterns pose a fire risk, especially around small children.

When my family has to use a kerosene lantern, we place the lantern in a bathroom so the light can reflect off of a mirror, and several inches away from the edge of the counter top.

When picking a lantern, be sure to take the size of the reservoir into consideration. The larger the reservoir, the longer the lantern can operate.

If kerosene is going to be included in your long term SHTF survival plan, keep in mind your kerosene is going to run out sooner-or-later. Continue Reading….

Survival Gear Salt Flashlights and Seeds

buying shtf survival gearA couple of weeks ago I posted a video on youtube talking about spreading your survival gear purchases out over time. Instead of forking out $400, $500 or even $600 at a time, just spend $40, $50 or $60 at a time. After a few trips to the store, your probably going to be surprised at the amount of gear that can be stockpiled.

A couple of weeks ago my kids and I went to the camp for 2 days. While we were there we decided to walk around the property at night. The following is what I like to call the “can opener” effect – its were you get so involved with the bigger things that you overlook the small stuff.

During the rush to get packed, all three of us forgot to grab a good flashlight. After looking through the flashlights that we have stockpiled at the camp, I realized that we had several hand crank flashlights, but no good quality LED flashlights. Hand crank lights are fine for inside the house, but when you need to secure the property, you need a good quality light. The only good quality light my kids and I had was the Surefire 6PX Tactical on my Ar-15. My daughter and my son were able to find some cheap led lights that were barley bright enough to see the ground. We walked around the property, looked at some stuff and then went back to the trailer. While my kids and I were walking around in the middle of the night, I made up my mind that some good LED lights would be in my next purchase.

Purchases for March 6 2011 include:

6 – 1 pound 10 ounce containers of salt
100 rounds Winchester 9mm 115grain round nose
4 pack energizer AAA Lithium batteries
1 – Coleman 90 lumen LED flashlight
1 pound regular pinto beans (for the garden)
1 pound yellow dent field corn (for the garden)
$1 worth giant noble spinach (for the garden)
20 pounds seed potatoes – hopefully to get planted next week

Continue Reading….

Surefire G2X Pro Flashlight Review

surefire g2x proLong story short, I like the Surefire G2X Pro.

Now for the rest of the story. The other day I received a Surefire G2X Pro test sample. Even though Surefire supplied the test flashlight, it in no way influenced my opinion on the light. Mainly because I was not the one testing the light, it was my 14 year old daughter, I was just an observer in the test. My daughter needed a compact flashlight for finding her way to the deer stand and camping trips anyway, so things worked out well there.

I’am a firm believer in testing your equipment before you need it. So what better way to test a flashlight then to use it to find our way back to the truck after getting out of the deer stand.

Before my daughter and I set out on our journey, we took the Surefire G2X Pro flashlight out of package, and made sure t worked before w headed to the woods.


Continue Reading….

On the topic of handcrank flashlights

Lets talk about handcrank flashlights for a little bit. This topic might have been discussed a lot, but its good to have a refresher.

Over the past few years I have been trying to stock up on those hand crank flashlights and lanterns. But instead of having a bunch of them at my home (which I do), I have been bringing some of them to “the camp”.

When my family and I go to the camp, sometimes its after dark when we get there. After we arrive, I will grab a flashlight to go turn on the propane. I do not want to have to worry about dead batteries in the flashlight.

There have been a few time that thunder storms have knocked out power at the camp. I do not like looking around for extra batteries in the dark – especially when we have mouse traps set out.

Its very convent to grab a flashlight, shake or give it a couple of twist, and you have instant light.

Here is one of the issues, it might be 2 – 4 months between trips to the camp. That gives the batteries in the flashlights a long time to go dead.

Also, if you leave those cheap batteries in your flashlights -the ones that leak acid – your gear can be ruined before you know it. Just the other day I found an AM/FM radio that the batteries had leaked in and ruined the device. The radio was a cheap one, so its not a lot of money lost, but it is a piece of equipment that will need to be replaced.

I have heard of long term storage batteries, ones that you can keep stored for decades,,,, but why? I see no real reason to invest in stuff like that. They are going to go dead after you put them in the flashlight anyway.

The crank flashlights make good hand outs to the kids. If the light gets set down and the batteries go dead, just give it a few shakes or twist. This past weekend while on a camping trip with my daughter, I gave her a twist flashlight to keep in her tent with her. I told her to twist the end to charge it up, and she was like “ok, no problem.”


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Hybrid Shake Flashlight Review

One thing about a shake flashlight – you do not have to worry about the batteries going out. A few days ago I was watching one of those TV shows about survival. The guy in the show was talking about urban survival in a post apocalyptic world.

While scavenging through a building, the star of the show was talking about his flashlight, which was a maglight that used D sized batteries. There was a mention of looking out for batteries for the flashlight. My thought was – why not use a shake flashlight? That way your not dependent on batteries.

Instead of having to rely on disposable batteries, look into getting a few hand crank – shake flashlights. That way you do not have to worry about scavenging batteries.

Please post your comments in the Hybrid Shake Flashlight Review thread of the forums. Special thanks goes to ReadyPro.org for supplying the flashlight for this review. Continue Reading….

Dyno Powered Devices

Back on 08-08-2007, forrestdweller posted an interesting thread on the forum. At the time it did not get very much attention. As I was going through some of the older threads, I took notice of it. Dyno Powered Devices are really underrated and overlooked. As I walk around the local big box mart, there are Dyno Powered Devices all over the place – but there is no disaster on the horizon either. If there was a hurricane looming in the distance, you can be rest assured that people would be buying every Dyno Powered Device they could get their hands on. Instead of waiting until the last minute, go ahead and stock up on a couple of those items. There are a couple of items Continue Reading….

Flashlights sold out before the storm

As Hurricane Ike was approaching Texas in September of 2008, one of the first items to sell out was flashlights. The cheaper the flashlight, the faster it sold out. And it was not just regular flashlights that sold out, it was also the hand crank kind.  This picture was taken about 2 days before Hurricane Ike made landfall.

Solar powered sidewalk lights instead of candles

Most people do not realize that they have a renewable light source right at their feet. And that is those solar powered lights along the walkway. If you do not have any solar powered sidewalk lights, take a look at a local hardware store, or big box mart – such as wal-mart, lowes and k-mart. They are usually in the garden section.

When shopping for a solar powered light, do not get the cheapest ones on the shelf. But then again, dont go overboard on the price either. There are usually 2 different colored lights – clear and amber. Do not get the amber colored lens, they do not put out as much light as the ones with the clear lens. Be sure to get the lights that use an LED and not a regular bulb.

The way those lights work, during the day the solar cell recharges 2 AA batteries. As the sun starts to go down, a light sensor tells the unit when to turn on. Depending on how much sun light the solar cell got, that defines how much light the unit can provide. The more sun light the cell is exposed to during the day, the longer the burn time at night.

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