Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: fishing tackle

Stockpiling trotline supplies

Weldbilt boat on the Angelina RiverYesterday evening I started working on some trotlines to be put out Friday evening. The first thing that I realized was how much supplies its going to take to deploy 2 trotlines about 150 long.

The line being used for the main beam comes in spools 300 feet long, and has a tensile strength rating of 330 pounds. When you start running a line across a slew, 100 – 150 feet can go pretty quick. One trotline I saw awhile back must have been close to 200 feet long.

Lets talk about running the main beam line of a trotline. With the spools having 300 of line, your probably going to need 3, 4, 5 or even 6 spools of line for a SHTF stockpile. This of course depends on how many trotlines your going to be running. Some of the slews that I fish in are probably 75 – 100 feet wide. With 300 feet per spool, I would only be able to run 2 or 3 lines across a slew. If I was running a trotline across the main river, 300 feet would probably only get me 1 trip across the river.

About every 6 – 8 feet on the main beam I tied a loop knot. In the loop knot I put a barrel swivel. The first 8 – 10 feet of line is for tying around a tree. From the first loop knot to the end of the line, I probably put about a dozen swivels on the trot line. To put this into perspective, for each 300 foot spool of main line, your going to need about 2 dozen heavy duty swivels.

How to organize a tackle box

How to organize a tackle box survival fishing supplies Last night I was going through my tackle box trying to get it a little better organized. The problem was that I had hooks and weights spread out over different section of the tackle box. The top of the box is mostly lures and a few weights and hooks. With the bottom of the box being an assortment of different hooks, weights and other supplies.

After looking through my tackle for a little while, I realized that I fish for about 3 different types of fish – perch, bass and catfish.

For perch I use split weight and small hooks. To organize my tackle box for perch fishing gear, I bought a small double sided container. On one side of the container goes hooks, on the other side goes split weights.

For bass fishing I use artificial bait, like worms and lizards. A bottom section of my tackle box is dedicated to artificial worms, on top of the worm is a small double sided container like what I keep the perch fishing stuff in. In this container hooks go on one side and weights go on the other side. Unlike the round split weights for perch fishing, the weights used for bass fishing are oblong split weights used for making a texas rig so the bait does not get hung up in the weeds.

For catfish I use a little bit larger hooks and some teardrop weights. A loop is tied in the fishing line, the end of the loop is inserted through the wire on the weight, then wrapper around the end of the weight. This makes the weight easy to take on and off the line.


Fishing with top water lures

Doing some fishing at Lake Sam Rayburn in East Texas. The tiny torpedo in the video is one of my favorite top water lures of all time. It seems to work best when the wind is not blowing very hard and the top of the water is smooth. If there are any hungry bass in the area, this lure will find them.

Some of the fishing gear I keep in my tackle box.

Page 1 of 11
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018