Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: emergency food preps

Stockpiling Mountain House Freeze Dried Pouches

Mountain House freeze dried pouches

A question to the reader, “Are you stockpiling Mountain House freeze dried pouches?” Let’s be honest, there are a number of reasons that can be debated for and against stockpiling Mountain House freeze dried pouches.

One of my main issues with the pouches is the sodium content. When I eat a meal, a few minutes later I can feel the sodium hitting my system. Sometimes the sodium is so bad I feel sick all over.

Some people may say Mountain House freeze dried pouches are too expensive, and they are. There is no denying the freeze dried pouches cost a pretty penny.

Let’s talk about sodium content first. A couple of pouches were picked from my personal stockpile so we could look at the sodium content.

Sodium Content

Mountain House Extends Life of Pouches to 30 Years

Mountain House freeze dried pouches

Mountain House recently extended the life of their pouches to 30 years, instead of 7 years. This is supposed to be retroactive to existing pouches produced before the date change.

How I found about about the date change, I posted a video on youtube called Stockpiling mountain house #10 cans and pouches. Someone posted a comment saying “Your way out of date regarding the life of the pouches.” So I started a thread on the forum – When did mountain house pouches go to 30 years.

When I go hiking or camping, Mountain House is my “go to” food. I love the ease of just boiling water, adding it to the pouch and having a hot meal.

When it comes to stockpiling food for a long term SHTf even of collapse of society, nothing beats a #10 can.

MRE VS Freeze Dried: Which Is Better For Stockpiling

Mountain House freeze dried pouches

MRE VS Freeze Dried, which one do you stockpile for a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI survival situation? Personally, I have uses for both. My food stockpile contains an assortment of MREs, freze dried 7 year pouches and several #10 cans of Mountain House freeze dried food.

When my buddies and I go on our annual camping trip on the Angelia River, I usually bring 7 year pouches for my main entree, and a couple of MREs for assorted snacks.

Lets discuss the various good and bad points of both. First, lets talk about MREs, and then freeze dried food.

MREs – Meals Ready to Eat

Something that is very important to my family and I is sodium content. My wife has high blood pressure, and my dad has heart issues. While stockpiling food, it is important to take special needs into consideration.

This is a partial list of sodium content to various MREs I have in my stockpile.

  • Beef ravioli in meat sauce – 1,080mg
  • Beef Stew – 850mg
  • Beverage Powder, Grape – 150mg
  • Beverage Base Powder, Lime Lime – 20mg – 150mg
  • Beverage Base Powder, Orange – 20mg – 150mg
  • Cappuccino, Mocha – 0mg
  • Cappuccino, French Vanilla – 0mg
  • Cinnamon Imperials – 12mg

For the full list, visit this article about sodium content in MREs.

Sodium content of MREs

For people with high blood pressure, the sodium content in MREs is an important consideration. Before you stock up on MREs as a survival food, first take a look at these numbers.

Beef ravioli in meat sauce – 1,080mg
Beef Stew – 850mg
Beverage Powder, Grape – 150mg
Beverage Base Powder, Lime Lime – 20mg – 150mg
Beverage Base Powder, Orange – 20mg – 150mg
Cappuccino, Mocha – 0mg
Cappuccino, French Vanilla – 0mg
Cinnamon Imperials – 12mg
Cinnamon Scone – 310mg
Cheese Spread (fortified) – 300mg
Cheese tortellini in tomato sauce – 840mg
Cherry Blueberry Cobbler – 170mg
Chicken and Dumplings – 240mg – 820mg
Chicken Fajita – 980mg
Chicken Fajita Filling – 700mg

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018