Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: disaster

Where would you go?

Where would you go?Please Rate This Article If you and your family had to evacuate, where would yall go? Part of the answer also depends on the situation, needs of the family members and type of disaster. Shelter in place or leave? There are many factors should help determine where there is a real need […]

Baby food considerations after a disaster

One consideration that is often over looked is baby food. Even though baby food is artifical food, and should be avoided, feeding infants after a disaster should be a serious consideration.

In the “real” world there is no such thing as baby food. There are no trees that grow jars of baby food, there are no baby food seeds that can be planted to grow a baby food plant. The only natural food for infants and babies is breast milk. Everything else is artificial food.

With this in mind, mothers that breast feed have a distinct advantage over mothers that do not breast feed. In the event of a disaster, mothers that breast feed their infants do not have to worry about formula, bottles or nipples. This means that infants that are breast feed have a better chance of survival in the event of some kind of wide spread or long term disaster.

Questions about survival gear

Questions about survival gearPlease Rate This Article If you have a question about survival gear, then visit the survival gear forum. Regardless if your looking for candles, flashlights, bug out bags (BOBs), alice packs, molle packs, or anything else, the community is there to help you. It does not matter what kind of disaster your […]

Barricaded store fronts during a disaster

When some type of disaster occurs, the owners of a store will take measures to protect their business and their property. A lot of places like wal-mart will stack bales of compressed cardboard in front of the doors.

These blocks of compressed cardboard act as a barricade to help stop people from driving cars or trucks through the front doors. Most of the time the front doors of these large stores will be made of glass – which offer little to no protection from a car or truck. During the Rodney King riots, some store owners also used these blocks of cardboard as bullet stops. Its kinda difficult for a bullet to penetrate 3 – 4 feet of compressed cardboard. The store owners were able to band together behind these blocks of cardboard, and stop the crowds of looters from destroying their stores .

This video was filmed just before Hurricane Ike made landfall in Galveston, Texas.

Hurricane Ike Video Series – Part 1

Hurricane Ike Video Series – Part 1Please Rate This Article On the morning of September 13, 2008, the eye of Hurricane Ike approached the Texas coast near Galveston Bay, making landfall at 2:10 a.m. CDT over the east end of Galveston Island. People in low-lying areas who had not heeded evacuation orders, in single-family one- […]

Hurricane Gustav – Part 1

Hurricane Gustav – Part 1Please Rate This Article As Hurricane Gustav approaches the coast of Louisiana and Texas, its time to start preparing. One of the first concerns is fuel for the generator. Gasoline is usually one of the first things to disappear, so its important to stock up while you can. Even if your […]

The first 72 hours after a disaster

The first 72 hours after a disasterPlease Rate This Article This past July 4th weekend my family and I spent 3 days at the camp. This “3 days” is important – the gubberment says that after a disaster you can expect at least 72 hours before relief services are put into place. While my kids […]

What to expect from the Red Cross

What to expect from the Red CrossPlease Rate This Article After Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans, a summer camp in east texas took in about 400 evacuees.  The camp in question was used during the summer by several of the local churches for religious and non-religious based events.  When hurricane Katrina struck, the camp was […]

Preparedness planning and baby food considerations

If there is one aspect of disaster planning that is often over looked, that is baby food and baby formula. While on a recent 3 day trip to the camp, one of the first supplies to run out was my grandsons baby formula. My stepdaughter did not pack enough of the dry powdered formula to get through the 3 day stay. This was no big deal. We just drove back to town, which was about a 20 minute drive.

But, what would things had been like if we had been in a disaster area? After regional or localized disasters, such as earthquakes or hurricanes – the government says to be prepared for at least 72 hours, which is 3 days. During this time do not expect any help or relief services.

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018