Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: disaster planning

What to take in a bug out situation

Some missionary goes to the Congo for 6 weeks to preach the salvation of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to the natives. As he boards the plane back to the good ole US of A he is not feeling to well. Its just a slight fever, nothing to worry about.

Fast forward 6 weeks, the once unknown airborne virus has wrecked havoc on mankind. With no vaccine and no natural resistance, people are dieing off like the Native Americans did to Small Pox. Which means that entire populations of towns were dieing.

Trip to the camp

Trip to the campPlease Rate This Article A couple of weeks ago my family and I made a trip to the camp.  The wisteria was blooming, the weather perfect, and life was good.  As we were packing up to go to the camp, I took the time to load up some survival stuff and “make […]

Food as a comfort blanket

comfort food post disasterDuring a stressful situation, food could be used as a comfort blanket.

After hurricane Rita blew through 4 1/2 years ago, we returned home from the shelter only to find the yard covered with tree limbs. One tree in the back yard had blown down, but landed away from my house. Some of our group started cleaning up the yard, and piling the limbs up. While this cleaning up was going on I started cooking. The pit was fired up, some sausage and steaks were cooked and we all had a feast right before dark.

It was of great comfort to have a good hot meal after a stressful event. The night before, it sounded like we had a train sitting on top of us for about 8 hours. The next morning everyone was stressed out, and edgy, but the hot meal was like a turning point for that day.

Good hot meal after a disaster

Never underestimate the power of a good hot meal during times of stress. After a disaster, and stress levels are up, food can be used as a comfort blanket.

When my family returned home after hurricane Rita, and Hurricane Ike in 2008, we found the yard covered with tree limbs. One tree in the back yard had blown down, but landed away from my house. Some of our group started cleaning up the yard, and piling the limbs up. While this cleaning up was going on I started cooking.

The pit was fired up, some sausage and steaks were cooked and we all had a feast right before dark.

It was of great comfort to have a good hot meal after a stressful event. The night before, it sounded like we had a train sitting on top of us for about 8 hours. The next morning everyone was stressed out, and edgy, but the hot meal was like a turning point for that day.

After a stressful event, plan on the group using a feast to comfort and reassure them that life will return back to normal. Then is not the time for powered eggs and freeze dried foods. Pull the steaks or ribs out of the freezer and cook them up.

The food in the freezer should be eaten before the packaged stuff anyway. So its a win win situation. The group gets a good hot meal and the perishable foods are eaten before they spoil.

Never underestimate the power of a good hot meal. It can really help with the morale of the group.

Post your comments in this thread of the urban survival forum.

Related Articles:

  1. Prepping the Bug Out Location
  2. Stockpiling food, ammo and fishing supplies
  3. Hastily assembled and ill equipped survival plans
  4. Bug out location essentials
  5. Long term survival plans
  6. Surviving a long term disaster

Written disaster plans

Written disaster plansPlease Rate This Article While planning for a disaster, an important consideration should be to write your plans down, make copies and then send those copies to your friends and family members. The plans should include destination during the evacuations, contact phone number, routes you plan on taking during the evacuation and backup […]

Urban Survival Disaster Preparedness Plans

Putting together a disaster preparedness plan can be a daunting task. To begin, let us start with some basic questions. What kind of disaster should be planned for? What kind of disaster gear should be included in the kit? How many people will the plans have to support? How long will the disaster last?

Location is very important. This is one of the first questions anyone developing a disaster plan should take into consideration.

Everyone that lives within 200 miles of the Southeastern coast of the USA or the Gulf of Mexico coast should plan for hurricanes and/or strong thunder storms.

Anyone that lives in the northern regions should plan on cold weather with lots of snow and ice.

Mountain / arid regions should plan for wild fires in the summer and snow along with ice in the winter.

Tornadoes should be considered, regardless of location.

Earthquake prone regions should plan for just that, earthquakes.

By those examples, each disaster plan and urban survival kit will be a little different. However, each kit should contain some of the same basic items.

Food & Water – most organizations tell people to have at least 3 days or 72 hours worth of food and water on hand. This is an unrealistic number. After a disaster, such as a hurricane, most relief organizations plan on having services in place within 72 hours. What if the family has 3 days worth of food and water, and the relief services are NOT in place during that time frame?

For the sake of discussion, lets say the Jones family has 14 days worth of food and water on hand. The Smith family has 3 days – just like the government advices. On the 5th day after some kind of disaster strikes, the Smith family is asking the Jones Family if they have any food they can spare.

Whatever the government says you need, double or triple that number.

Related Articles:

  1. Prepping the Bug Out Location
  2. Stockpiling food, ammo and fishing supplies
  3. Hastily assembled and ill equipped survival plans
  4. Bug out location essentials
  5. Long term survival plans
  6. Surviving a long term disaster
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