Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: cooking after shtf

Coleman 533 Dual Fuel Camp Stove

Coleman 533 dual fuel stove

The Coleman 533 dual fuel stove may not be small enough to take on an extended hiking trip, but its just right for around a camp site such as a park or survivalist retreat. If you need a stove to take to the lake or local park, then take a look at the Coleman 533 dual fuel stove.

Features

  • Dual Fuel engineering: operates on clean-burning Coleman Liquid Fuel OR unleaded gasoline
  • Fully-adjustable 10,500-BTU burner
  • 2.1-pints fuel tank runs for up to 2 hours on High setting
  • WindBlock system shields burner for maximum heat and reliable operation in all weather conditions
  • Filter funnel included

Stocking Firewood at the Bug Out Location

Cut and split firewood

For thousands of years mankind has used firewood for cooking and warmth. Even today thousands of people still rely on wood for their everyday cooking needs. When prepping for a SHTF event firewood could be a reliable and long term cooking solution.

Firewood is an important asset – but its only an asset if the person can utilize it. In this case a storm blew down an oak tree. Instead of the tree going to waste, it was cut up for firewood.

During a long term SHTF survival situation, after the propane runs out, after the liquid fuel runs out for the camp stoves, its either going to be cooking with solar ovens, or cooking with wood, or not cooking at all.

After hurricanes Ike and Rita made landfall, I cooked for my family for between 2 – 3 weeks with firewood. For breakfast we would used a coleman stove to cook with, and for dinner we used my barbeque pit on a trailer.

Cooking Considerations After a Disaster

Pit at deer camp

After a disaster such as a earthquake or hurricane, chances are the power is going to be cut off. From previous examples set by hurricanes Katrina, Andrew, Hugo and Rita – in some cases it could take weeks or months to rebuild the power lines. Its during this time that a simple hot meal can really boost the moral of the group. Just for the sake of discussion, “Group” is defined as friends, family or neighbors.

Some people of the community are ill prepared to cook without a power source, while others may be able to cook for a few days with no power. It is the job of the survivalist to make sure that they have the means to cook for not only your family, but for the neighbors. This can be a daunting task, but with a little planning it can be done.

With a little welding skill and some hard work, a survivalist could build anything from a pit on wheels to a grill that goes over a camp fire. Once the power goes out, the first thing that should be cooked and eaten is the meat out of the freezer and refrigerator.

Another investment that should be considered is a high quality ice chest, like a coleman 7 day ice chest. If kept out of direct sunlight, frozen foods will remain cold for 5 – 7 days. But this is dependent on the outside air temperature.

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018