Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: carrots

Old Style Carrot Farming

A sandy soil or light loam is best for carrots, but they will grow anywhere under good culture. Enormous quantities are grown by the market gardeners, both under glass and in the open ground, for use in soups and for seasoning purposes. The short or half-long varieties are demanded by this trade.

Farm gardeners will do best with half-long and long kinds, unless a special demand calls for the smaller carrots. The large half-long and long ones are suited to both culinary and stock-feeding purposes.

It requires from three to four pounds of seed to the acre, depending on the distance between the rows. The plants should be from 3 to 5 inches apart in the rows, and the rows as near together as is feasible for horse work. Clean culture is demanded. The seed must be planted shallow, and may go into the ground as early as it can be worked in the spring, and from that time until the middle of June. The only danger about late planting is the possibility of dry weather.

ROOTS TURNIPS BEETS and CARROTS

If there be any who still hold that this country must ultimately rival that magnificent Turnip-culture which has so largely transformed the agricultural industry of England and Scotland, while signally and beneficently increasing its annual product, I judge that time will prove them mistaken.

The striking diversity of climate between the opposite coasts of the Atlantic forbids the realization of their hopes. The British Isles, with a considerable portion of the adjacent coast of Continental Europe, have a climate so modified by the Gulf Stream and the ocean that their Summers are usually moist and cool, their Autumns still more so, and their Winters rarely so cold as to freeze the earth considerably; while our Summers and Autumns, are comparatively hot and dry; our Winters in part intensely cold, so as to freeze the earth solid for a foot or more.

Hence, every variety of turnip is exposed here in its tenderer stages to the ravages of every devouring insect; while the 1st of December often finds the soil of all but our Southern and Pacific States so frozen that cannon-wheels would hardly track it, and roots not previously dug up must remain fast in the earth for weeks and often for months.

BEEF STEW

1 lb. of meat from the neck, cross ribs, shin or knuckles

1 sliced onion

¾ cup carrots

½ cup turnips

1 cup potatoes

1 teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

½ cup flour

1 quart water

Soak one-half of the meat, cut in small pieces, in the quart of water for one hour. Heat slowly to boiling point.

Season the other half of the meat with salt and pepper. Roll in flour. Brown in three tablespoons of fat with the onion. Add to the soaked meat, which has been brought to the boiling point. Cook one hour or until tender.

Add the vegetables, and flour mixed with half cup of cold water. Cook until vegetables are tender.

CURRIED VEGETABLES

One-half cup dried peas, beans or lentils, soaked over night and cooked until tender.

½ cup turnips

½ cup of carrots

1 cup outer parts of celery

½ cup of peas

½ teaspoon celery salt

⅛ teaspoon pepper

3 tablespoons drippings

3 tablespoons whole wheat flour

1 teaspoon curry powder

1 teaspoon salt

½ cup meat stock or water

1 cup tomato juice and pulp

1 teaspoon onion juice

Melt the fat. Add the seasoning; gradually the liquid. Add the vegetables.

Cook 20 minutes. Serve very hot. This is an especially good way of adding the necessary flavor to lentils.

FISH AND VEGETABLE CHOWDER

3 lbs. fish

2 cups diced potatoes

⅓ cup chopped onion

½ cup chopped salt pork

1 teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon cayenne

1 cup peas

2 cups cold water

2 tablespoons fat

2 tablespoons flour

1 cup diced carrots

1 pint scalded milk

Cut fish into small pieces. Cover bones, fins and head with cold water. Simmer 15 minutes; strain. Cook onion and salt pork until brown.

In kettle place layers of fish and mixed vegetables. To water in which bones, etc., have been cooked, add the seasonings. Mix all ingredients. Cook forty minutes, slowly, covered.

CREAM OF CARROT SOUP

2 cups diced carrots

2 cups water

1 cup milk

⅛ teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons fat

2 tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon salt

Cook the carrots in the water until tender. Melt the fat, add dry ingredients, add gradually the 1 cup water in which the carrots were cooked and the milk. When at boiling point, serve with a little grated [pg 108] raw carrot sprinkled over top of soup. Any vegetable, raw or cooked, may be used in the same way, as cauliflower, cabbage, peas, turnips, etc.

VEGETABLE SOUP

1 qt. boiling water

½ cup carrots

½ cup cabbage

1 cup potatoes

1 cup tomato juice and pulp

1 tablespoon minced onion

¼ teaspoon pepper

4 tablespoons fat

4 cloves

1 bayleaf

2 teaspoons salt

4 peppercorns

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

Heat onion, pepper, salt, bayleaf and peppercorns with tomatoes for 20 minutes. Strain. To juice and pulp add other ingredients and cook slowly 1 hour. Add parsley just before serving.

CARROT SALAD

Grind raw carrot in food chopper. Make French dressing with chicken fat instead of oil. Mix ingredients and serve.

1 cup raw carrots

½ cup oil (preferably oil from chicken fat)

1 tablespoon vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon parsley

⅛ teaspoon paprika

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Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018