Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Tag: bug out location

Picking a Camp Stove for a Bug Out Location

Propane Coleman Stove

Some kind of long term disaster has happened, you and your family have almost depleted the food and water reserves at your home, now it’s time to make a decision, stay or go? Its time to go.

Your family loads whatever gear, food and water you have left in the truck, car or SUV, then you hit the road. You get to the Bug Out Location, unload your gear, and now what? You cook a good hot mean, that’s what.

Never underestimate the power of a good hot meal on moral. The smell and sight of cooking food does something to the human mind, it relaxes us. The effect of cooking food might have something to do when we led a hunter-gather lifestyle. The hunters would come back to camp with a leg quarter off a horse, deer or a chunk of meat off a mastodon. The meat was cooked over an open fire for everyone in the group to partake.

Ok, so what kind of stove do you store at the Bug Out Location? This needs to be at least a dual burner stove, something large enough you can cook a full meal on.

Coleman Perfectflow Stove

Stockpiling Ammo at the Bug Out Location

Stockpiling ammunition for SHTF

Stockpiling ammo at the Bug Out LocationThis past weekend I decided it was time to organize the ammunition at the Bug Out Location. We had ammo stored in 3,,, 4 different locations, which made taking inventory a pain in the rear end.

My wife cleared off a wire shelf so I could bring it to the camp and organize the ammo stockpile. The idea was to get all of the ammo together, see what we have and go from there.

Ammunition at the Bug Out Location is your “oh crap, the S has seriously HTF.” If you have to rely on the ammunition stockpile that you BOL, something really bad has happened – you and your family have had to leave your home, friends and family are probably knocking on your door asking for help,,, things have gone from bad to worse.

Because I look at BOL ammo as a last resort, I only stockpile what I normally shoot in my rifles. This is ammunition that has been tried, tested and proven to work in my rifle and on the game animals in my area. Why use a certain type of ammunition during hunting season, and stockpile a different type of ammo at the Bug Out Location? While this applies to hunting ammo, I look at defensive ammo in a different light.

As for defensive ammo, I stockpile one type, and its something that preforms well in my rifles. The goal of defensive ammo is to poke holes in the target.

Having a Stove or Grill at the Bug Out Location

Bug out location stove

How do you plan on cooking at your bug out location? Some kind of disaster has happened, you and your family have moved to the bug out location, you open a #10 can of chili mac,,, and now what? What are your plans on cooking that the bug out location? Do you have a propane camp stove, or maybe an outdoor wood grill?

In other words, the SHTF, now what?

In this article we are going to be looking at propane stoves, wood grill and touch on solar.

Propane Stove

Propane is a short term answer to a long term problem. Propane has several advantages – it stores well, it burns clean, and propane has multiple uses.

Bug Out Bag Topics

Over the years I have seen one topic that has been repeated over and over, and that is the topic of the bug out bag.

In reality, a bug out bag should contain copies of important papers, house title, car title, insurance policies, change of clothes, snack, or even 2 – 3 days worth of food, change of clothes, phone number contact list, and any prescription medicines you might be taking. The list will vary depending on the person and what they want to bring with them.

People that live close to railroad tracks or chemical plants might be asked to flee their homes due to a chemical release accident. The bug out bag is for people to grab, run, and have some basic supplies with them.

In fantasy, the bug out bag will be used to bug out to the wilderness when society collapses.

This video pokes fun at the different viewpoints on bug out bags.

Gun Cleaning Supplies at the Bug Out Location

DS-Arms SA58 FN/FAL next to a river in southeast Texas

This evening I was cleaning my FN/FAL, at which time I realized my gun cleaning supplies at the bug out location were going through a can opener syndrome. The “can opener syndrome” is when someone overlooks the small items. That you might be so focused on buying #10 cans, that you forget to stockpile can openers.

With gun cleaning supplies, people are probably more focused on stockpiling ammo, and shooting their firearms, that the forget about buying cleaning supplies.

Gun Cleaning Items

  • Storage Box – something to store the items in. In my case, I am using a large tackle box
  • Copper bore brushes – for scrubbing the inside of the barrel
  • Gun oil – I like the pump spray bottles
  • Hoppes #9 powder solvent
  • Bore light – I use an led light with a flex neck
  • Screw drivers
  • Cleaning rods – for pushing the bore brush through the barrel
  • Cloth patches

Hastily Assembled and Ill Equipped SHTF Survival Plans

Fig tree at the survival camp

Science channel Saturday morning of July 30, 2011 had a program on about Kublai Khan, and his doomed fleet that tried to invade Japan.

During excavations of the ocean floor, scientist discovered that most of the ships in the fleet were flat bottom river boats. River boats do not have a keel like what ocean going ships have. The keel helps ocean going ships weather large waves, while flat bottom boats will capsize.

It appears that Kublai Khan was in a hurry to invade Japan, so he ill equipped his navy with the wrong type of ship. This short sight meant the fleet was lost in a storm.

How does the example of Kublai Khan apply to survivalism?

Those that do not take the time to properly prepare are doomed to fail. The key word there is “properly” prepare. Kublai Khan had his army, weapons, armor, supplies, ships,,,,,. But the ships were the wrong type of ship, they were not ship designed for oceans, they were designed for rivers.

In the survivalist community, there are a lot of people that plan on grabbing their bug out bag, bugging out to the wilderness and living off the land. There are lots of problems with that situation, such as being able to find enough food, diseases, illness, vitamin and mineral decencies,,, only to name a few.

Can opener syndrome

Survival camp water well

The can opener syndrome is when your so focused on larger things, that you forget about the smaller items.

An example of this happened a few months ago when my kids and I went to the camp for the night. Around 10pm or so we decided to go out and take a look at the fields.

Guess what, we forgot to grab our regular flashlights and bring them to the camp with us. This left us with the handcrank flashlights that I had stockpiled. Handcrank flashlights might be good for around the house, but their not good for lighting up a 10 acre field.

Over the past year or so I had been more focused on planting fruit trees, stockpiling ammo and first aid supplies,,,, other odds and ends that I had totally overlooked some simple and inexpensive LED lights for the Bug Out Location.

Carving and steak knives is another thing I had overlooked. A couple of months ago I found a knife set at an estate sale, so I bought the set and brought it to the camp. Now we have a set of carving knives, steak knives and a knife sharpener.

Cleaning Up The Bug Out Location

survivalist camp bug out location

survivalist camp bug out locationToday started out around 8 am with a shower, breakfast bar, and a monster energy drink. From there my wife and I went to the local wal-mart, step daughters house, rented a carpet cleaner, sonic for a cheese burger, and the local feed and fertilizer store.

From the feed store, we went to the camp to meet up with my parents and some other family members. After arriving at the camp, we cleaned out a spot for my uncles RV. My uncle and my aunt got on the hunting lease with my family, so their going to be parking their RV at my parents place. We had one person on a Craftsman chainsaw, one person on a pole saw, and 3 people pulling limbs out of the way.

Some of my observations:

Missing Gear from the Bug Out Location

You know what really sucks, is when your trying to stockpile survival gear at the bug out location, and stuff keeps coming up missing. Awhile back the liner of my parka went missing, pair of cold weather gloves, shotgun shells, and now some lithium batteries and a LED flashlight are missing.

Its not that someone is breaking into the location and stealing the stuff, I think its more along the lines of someone “borrowing” the supplies and not bringing it back or replacing it.

Over the past 15+ years, I have been making it a point to keep certain types of survival gear at the bug out location. Whether its blankets, flashlights, knives, ammo, first aid supplies, water filter, hand tools, eating utensils,,,,,, I like to keep a general stockpile of gear at the camp. I don’t know how much time and money has been invested over the past decade alone to make sure we have plenty of survival gear for some kind of SHTF situation.

This last couple of items that went missing were nothing more then an $18 led flashlight, and some energizer lithium batteries. In all, the 2 items cost about $30. Thirty dollars is nothing to really worry about, as long as “someone” is getting use out of them. Its the fact that I put the gear at the camp for a certain reason, and now the stuff is missing.

Cooking after TEOTWAWKI / SHTF

cooking after shtfWhat is your long term cooking solution post SHTF? We are not talking 2, 3 or even 5 days after the power goes out, we are talking about cooking for the long term – 1 year, 2 years, or even 3 years.

Most of the people that visit the forum know about my long term survival cooking solution, its a pit on a trailer with a cooking surface 6 feet 9 inches long and 29 inches across. The main pit is built out of a 250 gallon butane tank, the smoker and fire box are out of a 250 gallon tank. When I built my pit, I wanted something that was big enough to put a whole hog or deer on. With the smoker, maybe I can even make my own sausage.

Not everyone is going to have a pit with a built in smoker, so what are your choices.

Charcoal grill that can also use wood
Fire ring
Propane grill – but propane will run out sooner or later
Single burner propane or butane stove
Wood stove
Fireplace
Solar oven

Stockpiling a Variety of Food for SHTF

Last weekend my kids and I went to the camp for 2 days; for our trip we packed a variety of food – some chips, several canned goods and some beef jerky. I’ll tell you what, after eating the same type of canned food for even 2 days, it was getting old and quick. This is where the thought of stockpiling beans and rice comes into mind. I have heard of survivalist stockpiling hudnreds of pounds of dried beans and dried rice for some kind of SHTF situation.

The problem is, nobody wants to eat the same food day in and day out for weeks and months on end. After the first few days,,, maybe the first couple of weeks people are going to get sick of eating the same thing over and over. That is why its important to stockpile a variety of food for SHTF.

Not only does a variety of food make things easier to eat, varieties also cover a wider range of nutrients.

Organizing Your Bug Out Location

cooking post shtfThe other day my wife and I were up at the camp / bug out location checking on things. We go up there, check the doors, check the windows, look for any physical damage that might have resulted from a break in. We also take inventory – bottled water, soft drinks, plates, plastic spoons and forks, canned goods, MREs, ammo,,,, stuff like that.

While I was checking the front bed room and closet, I noticed that the closet has a lot of wasted room. In the right hand corner of the closet sites 2 or 3 ammo cans loaded with 223, 7.62×39, 9mm, 357 magnum, and 45 acp. Besides the ammo cans, there is a lot of wasted space that could be used for shelving.

Awhile back I posted a thread in the forum about organizing my MRE stockpile. But that thread only talked about organizing your MREs, but what about everything else?

Bugging out to the wilderness plans

wilderness bug outIt was probably around 1997 or 1998, some of my buddies were over at my house and we were talking about possible situations that would cause a wilderness bug out. We were talking about an outbreak of the plague, nuclear strikes, nuclear targets, radiation fallout, wind currents,,,,,,; it was one of those brain storming sessions we used to have.

Eventually the topic of firearms came up, choice of calibers, being able to carry plenty of ammo,,, and so on.

It was at this time I pulled out a large ALICE pack, a Mossberg 500 with 18.5 inch barrel and an H&K SP-89 pistol. As I look back on the situation, and what we were discussing, neither of those weapons would be good for survival.

The Mossberg 500 with 18.5 inch barrel and pistol grip would be a terrible choice for hunting. The pistol grip makes the weapon difficult to aim, and the short barrel means a poor pattern. If this shotgun would have had a stock on it and a longer barrel, then it would be a different story.

The H&K SP-89 is a great pistol for close quarters combat, but it would be a poor choice for hunting deer or wild hogs. The lack of a shoulder stock makes the pistol undesirable for certain situations.

After my buddies and I completed our brain storming session, I decided it was time to review some of my survival weapon choices. I had other weapons, so “why” did I pick those 2 for discussion? Why not talk about the SKS as a survival rifle, or maybe the AK-47, or what about the Remington model 700?

After talking about the advantages and disadvantages of a short shotgun and pistol combo, I decided to remove those 2 weapons from my choices.

If your going to pick a weapon (pistol, rifle or shotgun) for survival, why not pick on that you can aim, and effectively take wild game with?

Essential Survival Gear for a Bug Out Location

deer camp hunting lease

Lets take a look at some essential survival gear for the bug out location

Running water – modern civilization is built off of several things: running water, sanitation and the ability to make hot water, only to name a few. Having a raised water tower makes most of the items on that list possible. Through running water we are able to wash our hands, flush our toilets, and run water through a hot water heater (propane powered of course).

Having a raised water tower is easier then a lot of people think. Farm supply stores sell water tanks is sizes like 250 gallon, 500 gallon and 750 gallon. With the help of some power tools, stainless steel or galvanized lag bolts, rubber strips for washers, drill bits, some 8 – 10 foot round poles for legs, PVC pipes and fittings, some hard work, sweat and custom engineering, its very possible to have your very own raised water tower. With the base of the tower just 5 – 6 feet off the ground, this can create enough pressure for people to wash their hands, fill a toilet, and maybe even run the water through a small hot water heater.

To keep the water tank filled up, pump water from a nearby creek with a solar powered water pump, or have a well put down and install a hand pump on the water well.

With a “little” imagination, custom engineering, sweat and determination, just about anything is possible, and that includes running water without electricity.

Safe place to sleep

Bug Out Location Cooking Solutions

Cooking at the bug out location

What are your plans for cooking with no electricity? Some people might have a grill on the back porch, some people might have a wood burning stove, with others may have no cooking options at all.

Let’s say worse case situation and the family has to bug out to the remote camp, now what? What are your cooking solutions?

Lets divide cooking into three layers:

  1. Personal cooking
  2. Family / Unit cooking
  3. Communal cooking

Personal Cooking

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018