Recent Survivalist Forum Threads
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BUTTERMILK WAFFLES

Mix to a smooth batter, 4 cups of sour buttermilk, 5 cups of flour, and add 1 tablespoon of melted butter, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon of molasses.

Add the well-beaten yolks of 3 eggs, 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls of baking soda, dissolved in a little hot water.

Lastly, add the stiffly-beaten whites of 3 eggs.

Place about 3 tablespoonfuls of the batter on hot, well-greased waffle irons.

If buttermilk cannot be procured, sour milk may be used with good results, providing the milk is quite sour.

From this quantity of batter may be made twelve waffles. Serve with maple syrup or honey.

CORN CAKES

One pint of stale bread crumbs (not fine, dried crumbs), covered with
1 pint of sour milk.

Let stand over night.

In the morning add 1 tablespoon of butter, yolks of 2 eggs and a little salt, 1/2 teaspoon of salaratus (good measure), 3/4 cup of granulated corn meal, to which add a couple of tablespoons of bread flour, enough to fill up the cup.

Stir all well together, add the 2 stiffly-beaten whites of eggs and drop with a tablespoon on a hot, greased griddle. Make the cakes small, as they do not turn quite as easily as do buckwheat cakes. This makes about two dozen cakes.

RICE MUFFINS

1 cup cold boiled rice.
Yolk of egg and white beaten separately.
1 teaspoon sugar.
1/2 teaspoon salt.
1 cup sweet milk.
2 cups flour.
2 teaspoonfuls baking powder.

Put the rice, yolk of egg, sugar and salt in a bowl and beat together; then add 1 teacup sweet milk alternately with the flour, in which has been sifted the baking powder. Add the stiffly-beaten white of egg; bake in muffin pans in hot oven. This makes about fifteen muffins.

BREAKFAST MUFFINS

3 cups sifted flour.
1 teaspoon salt.
1 teaspoon sugar.
1 tablespoon butter and lard.
1/4 cake Fleischman’s yeast.
2 eggs.
2 cups boiled milk.

Place the flour, salt, sugar, butter, lard and yeast cake, dissolved in water, in a bowl and mix well; then add the eggs and milk, which should be lukewarm. Set to rise in a warm place over night. In the morning do not stir at all, but carefully place tablespoonfuls of the light dough into warm, well-greased Gem pans, let stand a short time, until quite light, then bake in a hot oven 15 to 20 minutes and serve hot for breakfast. These should be light and flakey if made according to directions.

Designing a long term survival garden

Lets say SHTF tomorrow, you break out your seed stockpile, till up some soil, and then what?  You plant your seeds and hopefully grow something.

The first year everything goes ok because you have some commercial fertilizer and get plenty of rainfall.  The second year does not go so well because you have depleted your fertilizer stockpile and there is a drought.

At this point yall are probably saying, “I will just do some composting and everything will be fine.”

This is the difference in survivalism as a theory and survivalism as an experience.

Where is that compost going to come from?  Do you have livestock so you have access to manure?  What kind of livestock do you have?  Do you have rabbits, chickens, goats, cow, horse,,, something else?  Or were you planning on obtaining livestock after SHTF?  Do you have a garden plot planned out, or were you going to bug out to the wilderness and plant your garden there?

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FISH AS A MEAT SUBSTITUTE

As the main course at a meal, fish may be served accompanied by vegetables or it may be prepared as a “one-meal dish” requiring only bread and butter and a simple dessert to complete a nutritious and well balanced diet. A lack of proper knowledge of selection of fish for the different methods of cooking, and the improper cooking of fish once it is acquired, are responsible to a large extent for the prejudice so frequently to be found against the use of fish.

The kinds of fish obtainable in different markets vary somewhat, but the greatest difficulty for many housekeepers seems to be, to know what fish may best be selected for baking, broiling, etc., and the tests for fish when cooked. An invariable rule for cooking fish is to apply high heat at first, until the flesh is well seared so as to retain the juices; then a lower temperature until the flesh is cooked throughout.

Fish is thoroughly cooked when the flesh flakes. For broiling or pan broiling, roll fish in flour or cornmeal, preferably the latter, which has been well seasoned with salt and cayenne. This causes the outside to be crisp and also gives added flavor.

Leftover bits of baked or other fish may be combined with white sauce or tomato sauce, or variations of these sauces, and served as creamed fish, or placed in a greased baking dish, crumbs placed on top and browned and served as scalloped fish.

Fish canapes, fish cocktail, fish soup or chowder; baked, steamed, broiled or pan broiled fish, entrees without number, and fish salad give opportunity to use it in endless variety.

Combined with starchy foods such as rice, hominy, macaroni, spaghetti or potato, and accompanied by a green vegetable or fruit, the dish becomes a meal. Leftover bits may also be utilized for salad, either alone with cooked or mayonnaise salad dressing, or combined with vegetables such as peas, carrots, cucumbers, etc.

The addition of a small amount of chopped pickle to fish salad improves its flavor, or a plain or tomato gelatine foundation may be used as a basis for the salad.

The appended lists of fish suitable for the various methods of cooking, and the variety in the recipes for the uses of fish, have been arranged to encourage a wider use of this excellent meat substitute, so largely eaten by European epicures, but too seldom included in American menus.

During the period of the war, the larger use of fish is a patriotic measure in that it will save the beef, mutton and pork needed for our armies.

BEEF STEW

1 lb. of meat from the neck, cross ribs, shin or knuckles

1 sliced onion

¾ cup carrots

½ cup turnips

1 cup potatoes

1 teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

½ cup flour

1 quart water

Soak one-half of the meat, cut in small pieces, in the quart of water for one hour. Heat slowly to boiling point.

Season the other half of the meat with salt and pepper. Roll in flour. Brown in three tablespoons of fat with the onion. Add to the soaked meat, which has been brought to the boiling point. Cook one hour or until tender.

Add the vegetables, and flour mixed with half cup of cold water. Cook until vegetables are tender.

MOCK DUCK

1 flank steak

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1 cup breadcrumbs

1 tablespoon onion juice

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

½ teaspoon poultry seasoning

1 pint boiling water

⅓ cup of whole wheat flour

Reserve the water and the flour. Mix other ingredients.

Spread on steak. Roll the steak and tie.

Roll in the flour.

Brown in two tablespoons of fat.

Add the water—cover and cook until tender.

CORNMEAL WAFFLES

1 cup cornmeal

½ cup flour

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼ cup corn syrup

1 egg

1 pint milk

1 tablespoon fat

Cook cornmeal and milk in double boiler 10 minutes. Sift dry ingredients. Add milk, cornmeal; beaten yolks; fat, beaten whites.

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES

½ cup boiled rice

½ cup flour

3 tablespoons fat

1 pint milk

⅔ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon soda

Stir rice in milk. Let stand one-half hour. Add other ingredients, having dissolved soda in one tablespoon cold water.

RICE WAFFLES

1 cup cold boiled rice

1½ cups milk

2 eggs

2 cups flour

⅓ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon melted fat

4 teaspoons baking powder

Add milk to rice and stir until smooth. Add salt, egg yolks beaten; add flour sifted with baking powder and salt; add fat; add stiffly beaten whites.

POTATO PANCAKES

2 cups of chopped potato

½ cup milk

1 egg

1 teaspoon salt

2 cups flour

5 teaspoons of baking powder

2 cups of hot water

Parboil potatoes in the skins for fifteen minutes. Pare and chop fine or put through food chopper.

Mix potatoes, milk, eggs and salt.

Sift the flour and baking powder and stir into a smooth batter.

Thin with hot water as necessary.

Bake on a greased griddle.

OATMEAL PANCAKES

2 cups oatmeal

1 tablespoon melted fat

⅛ teaspoon salt

Add:

1 egg beaten into a cupful of milk

1 cupful flour into which has been sifted 1 teaspoonful baking powder.

Beat well. Cook on a griddle. This is an excellent way to use left-over oatmeal.

BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES

2 cups sour milk

2 cups bread

Let stand until soft

Put through colander. For each one pint use:

1 egg

1 teaspoon soda

2 teaspoons sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

¾ cup flour

1 egg beaten

Mix well; bake at once on hot greased griddle.

SPLIT PEA PANCAKES

2 cups split peas

2 egg whites

⅓ cup flour

1 cup milk

2 egg yolks

2 tablespoons pork drippings

⅛ teaspoon cayenne

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoonful baking powder

Soak peas over night, cook, and when tender, put through a food chopper and mix the ingredients.

Bake on hot greased griddle.