Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Category: Fishing and Boating

Fishing and Boating

Bucket for trotlines and noodles

SHTF fishing supplies for catfish and trotlines

A few weeks ago I posted an article about fishing with juglines after SHTF. One of the problems is organizing the noodles and trot lines so they are easy to deploy.

In an effort to keep everything together, I bought a 5 gallon bucket. The bucket provided a way to keep the noodles and trot lines together, but it lacked compartments for holding hooks, weights, swivels and leader material,,,, and other odds and ends. This problem was fixed on Fathers Day.

On Fathers day my Grand kids picked me out a lid for my 5 gallon bucket. The lid is made by Plano, its 2 sided, has 6 compartments in the top tray, and the tray is removable for access to a storage compartment. The compartments are large enough for hooks, weights, swivels,,,, anything that you might need for setting up a jugline or trot line.

Along with the trotline and jugline material for catfishing, I am going to include some supplies for perch fishing, and maybe some stuff for bass fishing.

Buying Fishing Gear For SHTF

While my wife and I were doing our Sunday shopping at the local china-mart, I went to the sporting goods section to look at the fishing supplies. Choices, choices, so many choices. Should I get some perching supplies, or stuff for catfishing, bass fishing,,,,,. Do I want supplies for artificial or live bait.

A lot of survivalist stockpile freeze dried foods, food in mylar bags, canned goods, seeds for a garden and ammunition for hunting. One thing that I do not see talked about a lot is fishing supplies. Maybe fishing supplies is a given, that everyone should have fishing supplies stockpiled, or maybe its overlooked by a lot of people?

Fishing supplies bought today:

1. Zoom artificial lizard, 6″ long, cotton candy color – for bass fishing

2. Eagle claw hooks, box of 40, size 1/0 – for catfish, noodles and trot lines

How to Organize a Tackle Box

How to organize a tackle box survival fishing supplies

Last night I was going through my tackle box trying to get it a little better organized. The problem was that I had hooks and weights spread out over different section of the tackle box. The top of the box is mostly lures and a few weights and hooks. With the bottom of the box being an assortment of different hooks, weights and other supplies.

Some of the lures in the top of the tackle box include rattle traps, crank baits, beetle spins, and a couple of tiny torpedoes.

After looking through my tackle for a little while, I realized that I fish for about 3 different types of fish – perch, bass and catfish.

For perch I use split weight and small hooks. To organize my tackle box for perch fishing gear, I bought a small double sided container. On one side of the container goes hooks, on the other side goes split weights.

Since perch stay in shallow water, I try to keep a small stock of bobbers (corks).

For bass fishing I use artificial bait, like worms and lizards. A bottom section of the tackle box is dedicated to artificial worms, on top of the worms is a small double sided container like what I keep the perch fishing stuff in. In this container hooks go on one side and weights go on the other side.

Fishing in Sloughs and Gators

Southeast Texas Alligator

Short version: This morning my daughter and I went to a local park to go fishing. After a few minutes a 6 foot gator showed up to see what was going on.

Over the course of about 15 – 20 minutes, the gator slowly worked its way to within about 8 – 10 feet of the bank. the day was getting hot, and the gator was getting a little too close, so my daughter and I decided to pack up and go home.

Long Version: The day started off around 10:30am when my daughter decided it was time to drag herself out of bed so we could finally go fishing. I had already been up for a couple of hours, had gotten my shower, brushed my teeth, and even made a trip to the store to pick up a couple of low carb blue rock star energy drinks.

While I was waiting for my daughter to get ready, I went through my tackle box, sorted through some of my fishing gear, rounded up the fishing poles, loaded a small ice chest with drinking water into my truck,,,,, finally we were ready to go.

Fishing With Jug Lines After SHTF

Drop Lines for long term survival shtf situation

At the end of November of 2010 a buddy of mine and I went on a 3 day camping trip on the Angelina river close to Jasper, Texas. While we were camping, we took the boat and explorer some of the slews in the area.

As we were heading into the slew, there were some jug lines in the water. This got me to thinking, why couldn’t someone use jug lines for harvesting fish during a long term survival situation?

What do we need to make up some drop lines / jug lines?

  • Spool of trot line string
  • Hooks
  • Weights
  • Swivels – optional
  • Spool of monofilament line, something like 20# test
  • Something that floats – 1 gallon plastic bottle, noodle from local china mart, something like that.

When I started working on this jug line project, I wanted the system to be modular. Meaning, all of the parts needed to be easily replaceable. To accomplish this, loops where used in the trot line string.

Tie a loop knot in the end of the trot line string. Make the loop maybe 1.5 – 2 inches long.

Swivels

Going Out on the Angelina River

Weldbilt boat on the Angelina River

Last Saturday my wife and I went out on the Angelina River south of Lake Sam Rayburn for a day of fishing and relaxation. Long story short, it was hot, my wife got sunburned, and she caught the only fish of the day.

I don’t know what it is, but the fish just were not biting. The fish were not biting pumpkin seed worms in a Texas rig, nor were they biting a beetle spin. The only thing we even got a nibble on was a worm on a perch hook.

The boating trip really started on Friday. The boat was uncovered, the battery charged, rods pulled out of the closet, and some drop lines were made up. One thing that I wanted to try Saturday was some drop lines.

So I went to wal-mart, bought a couple of noodles that most people keep in their swimming pools. The noodle measured something like 56 inches long. In the end, I had 8 noodles measuring 7 inches long.

Survival Kit for a Small Boat

Boating on the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas

A couple of weeks ago my uncle and I went out on the Angelina river and did some fishing. While we were out on the river some bad weather came along. The weather was not bad enough for us to seek shelter, but we did steer the boat under some cypress trees to shield us from the rain.

As the drizzle was coming down, I thought about putting together a kit for the boat. What would happen if I were back in some slew, motor broke, and I was stranded over night. I really need to build a survival kit for the boat. Something that does not take up a lot of room, but has the supplies that someone might need to spend an unexpected night in the woods.

Shelter – The first issue with spending the night on the river is the mosquitoes. As the sun starts to go down, the little blood suckers from hell come out in waves. If I could speak mosquito, I am willing to bet they have little speakers under their wings that plays a variety of music as they swoop in to suck ever last drop of your blood. To defeat the mosquitoes, your going to need at least 2 things, something to build a bug proof shelter out of, and bug spray, something like Deep Woods Off.

Summer is Almost Over

As Labor Day approaches, this marks a good time to reflect over the past summer. Overall, the summer of 2010 was a great summer – my dad gave me a boat a few months ago, so a lot of time was spent on the river fishing and camping.

My wife and I got to go fishing a couple of times. Being sick for the first 2 weeks in August was no fun, but I’am felling a lot better now – except for a slight residual headache. With all Texas summers, the heat has terrible.

Labor day plans include a bar-b-q with a brisket, maybe some ribs, chicken, sausage, ranch style beans and whatever else I can fit on the grill.

After Labor Day focus is going to shift a little more towards hunting. My kids and I might head out to the deer lease to check the stands and feeders out.

Another Trip To The Angelina River

Angelina River Fishing

It was one of those trips that I have been wanting to make for a long time. The day before (July 9, 2010) I took the time to get everything ready – the gas cans were fueled up, the poles and tackle boxes were set next to the front door, the day packs were filled with fresh water, first aid kit, an Eversafe Meal, ice chest put in the boat… and a few more things were made ready.

The alarm clock went off around 5:45am – but I stayed in bed for a little bit. Got up, got my shower, brushed teeth, deodorant (you do not want body order while fishing), then I went into my sons room to wake him up.

While my son was getting his shower, and taking care of his business, I loaded the tackle boxes, poles and day packs in the boat.

We launched the boat at a place called “BevilPort” – which is off Farm to Market Road 2799, just Northwest of Jasper, Texas. As we were leaving the boat launch and heading south on the Angelina River, the sun started to break though the tree line.

It was a beautiful and memorial morning.

July 25 Trip to the Angelina River

The day started off kinda early (for a Saturday anyway). The plans were for my son and I to get up around the crack of dawn, get a shower, get something to eat and head out. But things did not work out that way. Instead of getting on the river around 6am, it was more like 8:30. But even if we got a late start, it was still a beautiful day, the gators were out and the fish were biting.

We launched the boat at Bevilport, which is a public boat launch off Highway 63. Coming from Jasper, Texas, you turn left at the VFW sign, then drive for about 4 – 5 miles. On the way your going to pass some nice looking fields with traces of old pecan tree plantations. There is one rather large field where the cows share the shade provided by a few oak and pine trees.

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018