Homesteading and Survivalism

Living a simple life

Handguns For Bug Out Location

Handgun for bug out location

Part of my overall prepping plans is to have enough firearms for friends and family members who bug out to my location.  I live in a rural area with privately owned that borders national forest and timber company land.

Hunting firearms is not a problem, the issue is handguns.

Let’s say some friends and/or family members bug out to my location.  Not everyone will get a handgun.  It is just impossible to stockpile enough handguns for everyone,

What is possible though, is to give out a couple of handguns for people doing security.  These are the people scouting the bug out location for signs of trespassers.  Someone who who is not supposed to engage the enemy.

What would be a good handgun to focus on?

Glock Style

Awhile back I was trying to figure out why are Glocks are so popular.  I came across a write up about how easy striker fired handguns are to train with.  Basically teach the person to keep their finger off the trigger until they are ready to shoot.  However, there is no safety buffer with that mindset.

Several years ago I was watching a documentary about the Jamestown colony.  One of the skeletons that was excavated had a downward gunshot to the leg.  It appeared that the person died from the wound.  It is speculated that the victim was standing next to someone who had a negligent discharge.

With historical references, should we hand untrained shooters handguns that do not have a safety?

Can preppers who have limited resources afford to deal with a gunshot from a handgun that did not have a safety?

Finger Is Not A Safety

Glocktards will say your finger is your safety,

A safety is a mechanical device that is not affected by stress, emotions or fear.  Safeties are not attached to nerves, muscles or tendons.

Safeties do not have reflexes that are usually beyond out control.

So no, your finger is not a safety.

Handgun Safeties

Safeties exist to help prevent harm to others from the reckless actions of an individual.  Whether it is drinking and driving, running a stop sign, or keeping a finger off the trigger, safeties exist to protect the innocent bystander.

With limited resources, can preppers afford to trust an individual with a firearm that does not have a safety?  With limited ammunition to train with, do we need to give someone a handgun, give basic instructions and then send them on their way?

In an ideal world everyone would be trained and efficient with firearms.  However, we do not live in an ideal world do we?  We live in an imperfect world and make the best with what we have.

Affordability

The term “stockpile” does not mean to buy dozens of handguns.  Just a typical handgun collection with a few extras thrown in would be my ideal setup.

Sigs, Berettas and Springfields can get somewhat expensive.  Some have safeties while others do not.

Glock is ruled out because it does not have a safety.

My personal opinion, Ruger is one of the best brand names to stockpile for the bug out location.  Something like the Ruger SR9.

The SR9 has a stainless steel frame, chambered in 9mm, has a safety and is affordable.  Stainless could come in handy when there are limited cleaning supplies.

Please do not buy bottom of the barrel priced handguns.

Other examples:

  • EAA Witness
  • FN FNS-9 9MM
  • CZ-USA SP-01
  • Walther, various models have a safety

What did I miss?

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock

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