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Thrunite Archer Flashlight Ultimate Review

Thrunite Archer Flashlight Ultimate Review
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This is a review of the Thurnite Archer 1A V3 flashlight. Awhile back I did a review of the ThruNite TN12. The TN12 took everything I threw at it and kept working. With this review of the Thrunite Archer I decided up up the game and add some different test.

Disclosure: The Thurnite Archer was sent to me at no cost to myself. This will not affect my opinion of the flashlight and hopefully will not affect your opinion.

Thurnite Archer 1A V3

The Archer comes with a lanyard and a heavy duty clip.  I removed the clip for the test.  To get the clip off I had to use a screw driver and pry it off the flashlight housing.

The name of the Thrunite Archer is a little misleading.  Rather than 1A, maybe it should be called 1 AA, as it holds a single AA battery.

Specifications

Thrunite Archer specs from the website:

  • LED: CREE XP-L V6 LED with a lifespan of 20+ years of run time.
  • Modes & Run-time:
  • Firefly: 0.1lumen(17days);
  • Low: 17 lumen (22hours);
  • Medium: 75 lumen (5hours)
  • High: 200 lumen (115minutes);
  • Strobe: 200 lumen (3.5hours).
  • Max output: 200 lumens using one Ni-Mh AA battery.
  • Max run time: 17days (Firefly mode)
  • Working voltage: 0.9v to 5.0v.
  • Battery: 1 AA
  • Max beam distance: 66 meters.
  • Peak beam intensity: 1088cd.
  • Impact resistant: 1.5 meters.
  • Waterproof to IPX-8 Standard (1.5meters)
  • Weight: 42g without battery
  • Dimensions: 110mm in length, 23mm bezel diameter.
  • Accessories: Pocket clip x1, Spare O-ring x1, Lanyard x1.

In my opinions specs are secondary to reliability. How reliable is the Thrunite Archer? That is what I set out to find.

Tests

Freeze test – Froze in a deep freezer at -12 for 17 hours. Why freeze the flashlight? To see if the compressing water could get past the o-rings.

After being frozen, but not shown in the video, the battery was taken out and there was no water inside the light.

Future test I am thinking about covering the light with maybe an inch of water, turning the light on low, then see if the light works when frozen. I have seem electronics stop working when temps reach freezing, such as deer feeder timers. The question I have is will the flashlight work at subzero temps.

After the light was thawed from the block of ice it was left submerged in the water for another 24 hours.

Impact test – The flashlight did not have enough mass to drive nails, so it was duct taped to a framing hammer. With the Thrunite Archer flashlight taped to the hammer head, three 12 penny nails were driven through a 2×4.

One of the worst feelings is when a flashlight is dropped and it stops working.

I do the impact test to simulate the sudden stop from a fall. Will any parts break loose from the impact?

The Thrunite Archer worked just fine after driving all three nails.

Truck test – To simulate the flashlight falling out of a moving vehicle. To make things interesting I tied some trotline string to the flashlight so that it was pulled behind the truck for a little while.

While my fiancee was driving down a country road I tossed the Thrunite Archer over the tailgate of my truck. At first the Archer came to rest, then was jerked when the string was pulled tight.

This was an enjoyable experience. The Thrunite Archer was bouncing all over the road. The light was pulled for a couple of hundred yards. The truck was stopped, I got out, walked to the light, and all the brightness settings worked.

Tire test – the Thrunite Archer was duct taped to the front tire of a Massey Ferguson 231 tractor. The 231 weighs around 4,000 pounds with no attachments. The tractor had a brush hog attached.

I wanted to see if the flashlight would crack, or the bezel break.

Everything works.

Road kill test – the Thrunite Archer was placed on a hard road and then ran over several times with the Massey Ferguson 231 tractor. The last time the bezel was propped on a rock.

Why use a tractor? Why not? Trucks, suvs and cars are common. Let’s do something different.

AA Batteries

Flashlights that use AA batteries are a big plus for me, which is what the Thrunite Archer uses.  There is a trend for flashlights to adopt 123a batteries.  I can not justify buying 2 different types of batteries for my gear.

GPS – Two AA batteries

Camera – Four AA batteries

Thrunite Archer – Single AA battery.

Where do 123a batteries fit into my gear?  They don’t.  I can not justify using two different types of batteries for my gear.

Thrunite Archer Final Thoughts

Overall, I really like the Archer.  It is just the right size to throw in a backpack and take on a day hike.

I do not know what else to say. The Thruniter Archer took everything I threw at it and it kept on working.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018