Homesteading and Survivalism

Living a simple life

Moving The Chicken House To The Farm

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What do you do when you have chickens and plan on bugging out? You build the chicken house where it will fit on a trailer, or in the bed of a truck.

When my wife and I built the chicken coop we knew that one day we would be moving. So the chicken coop was built so that it would fit on a dual axle trailer.  The inside of the trailer measured 7 feet, so the coop was built 6 foot 3 inches wide.Barred Rock Chicken

Today (July 20, 2013) my plans were put to the test. Here is the story of moving the chicken house.

What a day. Started off with breakfast, pulled my boat to the camp, picked up my son, back home, then moved the chicken coop into position to be loaded on a trailer.

Loaded the chicken coop on a trailer, dad pulled the coop and trailer to the camp while I had the run on a trailer attached to my truck.

Got to the camp, unloaded the chicken coop, attached it to the new chicken yard then let the chickens out.

The chickens went from a 6X10 enclosure, to a 73X33 yard.

Video about building the chicken yard

How do you move a box that weighs several hundred pounds and does not have wheels? You add wheels, then push it right along its way.

What kind of wheels did I add to the chicken coop? I used the aluminum spindle from my boat seats.

How did we lift the coop up to put the spindle under it? With a 5 foot long pry bar.

How did we get the trailer under the coop? We lifted one end of the coop with a pry bar, set it on blocks, then backed the trailer under the coop. The trailer we used tilted so all we had to do was push the end of the trailer down, then push the coop up on the trailer.

A ratchet strap was ran through both doors of the chicken house.

Each corner of the chicken house legs were screwed to the decking of the trailer.

Why did we move the chicken house

For the past 8 years my wife and I have been living close to town, maybe a little too close. I am sick and tired of listening to people playing their loud music, loud cars and trucks, not being able to have a large garden, not being able to have more then a few chickens, having to worry about my neighbors dogs,,, I am just tired of living close to town.

It is time to get back to basics, and get out to the country.

I yearn for peace and quiet, to raise my own food and to take control of the food my family and I eat.

Moving to the farm is just one small step in my goal to be self-reliant.

Pictures from the move

Whats next

The next phase of my SHTF / TEOTWAWKI chicken project will probably be to install an electric fence to keep predators out of the coop and yard.  The system I am looking at is the Parmak DF-SP-LI, which is solar powered and runs off a battery.

After the electric fence is installed I am looking at some kind of automatic watering system with a solar powered pump to pump water from a nearby stream.

Once everything is setup I hope to have at least two,  maybe three, 55 gallon drums feeding a system for the chickens to get water from.  If I could have two 55 gallon drums holding a total of 100 gallons of water, I would be happy.

After the watering system is on place it will be time to start on the next and final chicken coop.

The current coop measures 6 feet by 8 feet.

The next coop will measure 16 feet by 16 feet.

My goal is to have around 50 – 75 chicken at any given time.  But, I would like to be able to support around 100 chickens if the need ever arises.

Related ArticleHow many chickens would you need for SHTF

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock

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Updated: July 22, 2013 — 7:35 am


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