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I Believed The Lie of Capitalism

I Believed The Lie of Capitalism
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This is another one of my welding sucks articles. If you do not want to read about how bad it is to work in a fabrication shop in southeast Texas, just move along.

When I was growing up I was told that if you did a good job, your efforts would be recognized and you would be rewarded for your hard work.

I now know that is a lie.

The lie of “work hard in the hopes your employer gives you a raise” is a wage slave mentality. By working hard you set aside your own standards and adopt the standards someone else has set for you. Do you want to live life the way you want, or the way someone else wants?

“If I weld that nozzle and don’t bust an x-ray, then I will get a raise”,,, is a slave mindset. If I just do this, or if I just do that, then the owner of the company will be happy, and I will get some scraps from his table. Sounds more like the life of a dog rather then the life of a free man.

When I was working in the various welding shops around southeast Texas and southwest Louisiana, I would look at my pay check in disgust. I busted my ass, did a good job, and was rewarded with barely above poverty wages on 40 hours a week. How is someone supposed to buy a home, buy a car, have kids,,, on less then $25k a year? To listen to the weld shop owners, the employees should be proud to work in dangerous and dirty conditions of barely above poverty wages.

What I regret most about my career is:

1 – Believing the lie

2 – Going into the welding field

3 – Staying in the welding field

My first job at a welding shop was in 1986.  It took me from 1986 – 1995 to finally admit that welding sucked and I needed to get a new career path.  In 1995 I started going to Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas.

Now that I am out of the welding field I am free to express my frustration without the worry of getting blackballed.

I was once told that if an employee spoke up, the various welding companies would agree not to hire him, thus condemning the worker and his family to poverty.  Or, the worker would be forced out of the welding field.

Nobody had to force me out of working in welding shops, I left upon my own free will.  I was glad to leave and hopefully never look back.  The only time I look back is when I write these articles and have to pull up some old memories.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018