Homesteading and Survivalism

Ramblings Of A Bored Survivalist

Building A TEOTWAWKI Homestead

By Kevin Felts On January 11, 2013
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How viable are your long term SHTF survival plans?  That is a question I kept asking myself while a buddy of mine and I were talking.  The discussion was about water, livestock, food storage,,, just your basic stuff.  In reality, how viable are those plans for a complete collapse of society?

There is an old saying, “plan for the worst and hope for the best.”  My TEOTWAWKI survival plans are based off of a complete collapse scenario – no water, food, electricity or fuel from the outside world.Two Barred Rock Chickens

One way I am looking at arranging my farm is like a medieval farm, that is the only way I know how to describe it.  The goal is to supply our own water and food, but in a primitive format.  Today it would be called organic gardening.

Water

The first issue we have to address is water. Without safe drinking water life as we know it can not exist.

The plain is to have a well drilled, and to have an electric water pump put on the well.

For when the power goes out I want a pitcher pump to manually pump the water.

Having the well dug requires a rather large financial investment. We are talking in the $5,000 or more range.

There is a stream which runs on the edge of the property.  But, people live up stream from homestead.  When you have people or livestock up stream, then the water must be made safe to drink.  Even though I would not give the water from the stream to my grandkids to drink, I am considering the stream as a source of water for my chickens.

For the chickens I am thinking about installing a rain barrel on the coop, or using something like a solar powered water pump to pump water from the stream to a holding tank.  Or maybe a combination of both a rain barrel and solar water pump for the livestock?

Between a deep well for human consumption, rainwater barrel and water from the stream for livestock, hopefully that will provide enough safe water for everything.

Food

Fresh yard eggsAs of right now, my sustainable food production is divided into 3 phases – livestock, gardening and fruit trees.

Livestock – My current chicken flock includes 13 hens.  After my wife and I get moved to the homestead, I plan on building a new chicken yard and increasing the flock size to around 24 hens and a rooster.

Once the chicken flock has reached a sustainable size, the next phase will probably be goats.  I thought about raising pigs, but pigs do not produce milk.  The main reason for the goats is to produce  milk which can be used to make cheese and butter.

Directly across from where my house is going on the homestead there is a 2 acre field that could be fenced in for the goats.

Between the eggs, butchering the chickens, goats and goat milk, we have a sustainable source of protein and fats.  Not to mention eggs and chickens are a great barter item.  Who has not eaten eggs or chicken?  While some people may not be able to kill and eat a goat, most people have no objection to eating chicken or eggs.  How many people would object to having roasted chicken for dinner?

Gardening – Now that we have a supply of chicken manure, compost bin and maybe goat manure we can focus on our organic gardening project.

We want to focus on nutrient rich foods – onions, strawberries, peas, beans, squash, tomatoes, spinach,,, to name a few.

Directly behind the house I want to build some raised bed gardens for stuff like green onions, snap beans, strawberries,,,.  I do not eat green onions, but my wife does.

In an opening behind the house is where I want to put the main garden for stuff like corn, potatoes, beans, peas and watermelons.

Fruit Trees – Some of the nice things about fruit trees, they do not have to be replanted every year, nor do you have to worry about saving the seeds. Fruit trees are an excellent source of nutrients and we are able to make jelly from the fruit.

My current orchard includes:

Apple – 4 trees
Peach – 4 trees
Plum – 2 trees
Pear – 2 trees
Fig – 1 tree

Since I am not at the homestead full time I have been unable to care for the trees like what they need.  As a result they have not been growing or producing very much.

Once my wife and I get moved to the homestead I will be able to care for the trees and hopefully get them producing.

Something I would like to plant is some blueberry bushes.  Blueberries are packed in nutrients and they make a great jelly.

Pigs / Wild Hogs

Wild boar hog in penThere are probably going to be a lot of people who say pigs should be part of any farm, especially if one of planning on a complete collapse of society.

In part, I agree with that statement.

But, why keep domesticated pigs when there are so many wild hogs?  Why spend the time, effort and resources raising pigs, when my buddies and I can form a hunting party, get some hog hunting dogs, then go out to the woods and get a hog?

Related Forum ThreadCatching hog in the river bottom

Once the wild hog is caught and brought back home, it can be kept until its ready to butcher. If we want to use the hog for breeding, then we can. So its not like we have to buy pigs, when there are so many running wild in the woods.

Lets say pigs are not part of our plans. If we change our mind later on, we get together with some buddies who have hog hunting dogs, catch a hog, then maybe give the hunters some chickens and eggs in exchange for their time and effort.  Chances are people who have hog hunting dogs already have some pigs they caught and brought home.  Maybe barter a goat or some chickens for a pig?

If there is something you wish to add to the article, share your comments below.

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Kevin Felts

Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm clearing brush, working on a fence, building something, or tending to the livestock

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