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What Did We Learn In 2012

What Did We Learn In 2012
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Kevin Felts, blogger and survivalistAs 2012 is drawing to a close, lets take a few minutes to reflect. What did we learn and where do we need to go from here?

What did you learn in the past year?

I learned a lot about chickens – difference in the various breeds, how much room they need, chicken coop design, chicken yard size and nutrition requirements,, only to name a few.

What I learned in the past year is only a drop in the bucket. After my wife and I get moved to the homestead we plan on almost doubling the size of our chicken flock. Currently my wife and I have 13 hens and no roosters. After we get moved we will probably increase the size of the flock to around 24 or 25 hens, and one rooster.

The next step in my chicken project will be to develop a self-sustaining chicken flock.

Once the flock size is increased, the chicken coop will probably be too small. One of the next steps after getting moved will be to build a larger coop. But we are getting way ahead of ourselves.

Learned some general information on goats – my wife and I are not ready to get goats as of yet.

A couple of months ago I talked with a man who teaches agriculture at a local high school.  He told me about the Nigerian dwarf goat, which I am considering.

How fast things can go downhill – the Newtown shootings and the venom filled words of the gun haters drove panic buying. What surprised me was how fast physical stores and internet stores sold out.

AR-15 and AK-47 prices – doubled and tripled in a just a few days. Colt 6920 that sold at walmart for $1,100 was selling on auction sites for $3,000. Sig Sauer M400 that walmart had on black friday for less then $900 is selling for $1,900. WASR-10 that used to sell for $400 is now selling for $700 – $900.

Magazine prices – 30 round aluminum AR-15 magazines went from $10 each to $100 each.  Pmags went from $16 to $150 each.

Ammunition availability – not only were people buying guns, bolt carriers and upper receivers, they were also buying all the ammunition they could get their hands on.  For the first time in my life I have seen ammunition supplies stripped.  And its not just 223 Remington and 7.62X39 that people were buying, they were buying hand calibers and 22 long rifle.

The simply fact is, if you did not have it, you were not going to get it.

Never underestimate human greed, and underestimate large numbers of people panic buying.

Its a good thing were panic buying buns and ammunition, and not food.  If food had been stripped like ammunition, there would be a lot of hungry people.

Forum ThreadAs 2012 draws to a close, what did we learn in the past year?

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018