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Another stockpiling ammunition for shtf teotwawki article

Lets say that some kind of SHTF situation happens tonight, how ready is your ammunition stockpile?  Whether its nuclear war, plague, disease outbreak, collapse of the dollar,,,, something happens to disrupt society.  What kind of ammunition do you have stockpiled to hunt and protect your property?  Have you taken any wild game with the ammunition you have stockpiled?  Have you sighted in your rifle with the various types you have stockpiled?

My wife and I made a trip to the Academy sports and outdoors in Lufkin Texas just to buy some ammunition. It seems that the walmart in Jasper Texas can not keep certain types of ammunition in stock. Its either buy online, or drive almost an hour just to buy some ammo.

Todays Haul Includes:

100 rounds Federal 223 Remington
20 rounds 30-30 Winchester in Remington core-lokt 150 grain
20 rounds 308 Winchester in Remington core-lokt 150 grain
20 rounds 30-06 Springfield in Remington core-lokt 150 grain
120 rounds 7.62×39 in Monarch 123 grain full metal jacket

You may be asking “why so much Remington core-lokt?”

Because its a proven performer in southeast Texas whitetail deer.

I stockpile what I know works. Over the past decade and a half my family and I have taken dozens of whitetail deer with Remington core-lokt and in a wide range of calibers.

A few examples of deer taken taken with 30-30, 270 and 308 Winchester. All of these deer were taken with Remington core-lokt.

My family uses 5 different calibers – 270 Winchester, 280 Remington / 7mm Express, 30-30 Winchester, 308 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield.

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When you and your family and friends have several different rifle calibers, it is going to be easy to stockpile too many brands and bullet weights. Stick with what you can afford, and what you know works.

Take my 308 Winchester for example.  So far I have 3 different brands of ammunition stockpiled – Federal, Monarch and Remington.  Remington is my primary hunting ammunition.  I am testing the Federal and the Monarch to see which one I should buy more of.  With the 2 types of ammunition I have hunting grade ammo, and soft-points for slinging lead downrange.

I divide my ammunition in 2 categories – Hunting and Property Protection

Hunting grade ammunition are bullets that are designed to expand, and have a reasonable amount of accuracy.  You are going to pay a little more for hunting ammunition, but when you want to put food on the table, the price paid is going to pay off in the end.

When picked a hunting grade ammunition to stockpile, I use a cost divided by accuracy ratio.

A buddy of mine only shoots Winchester silvertip 308, but at a cost of around $30 – $35 for a box of 20.  For 1 box of Winchester silvertip I can buy 2 boxes of Remington core-lokt.  The question I ask myself, would I rather have 1 box of great ammunition, or 2 boxes of average ammunition?  The Remington core-lokt is not a tack driver.  But on the other hand most of my shots are less then 125 yards.

Winchester silvertip may be more accurate then Remington core-lokt on longer shots.  But are you going to see that much of a difference at 100 – 125 yards?

Out of my FN/FAL, Remington core-lokt gives about 1 – 1.5 inch groups at 100 yards.  Lets say Winchester silvertip gives 3/4 inch groups.  Is the improved accuracy worth double the price?  If you are shooting 200+ years, then yea, the improved accuracy may be worth the extra cost.

There is no absolute answer for stockpiling hunting ammunition for a SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation.  I stockpile what I use in southeast Texas.  Someone that hunts in mountain regions will probably stockpile a totally different type.

Stockpile what works best for you, period.

Property Protection is just that, what you are going to defend your family and your property.  This will be low cost full metal jacket or soft-point ammunition.

Up until now we have been talking about hunting rifles, such as the Marlin 336, Remington model 700 and Remington woodsmaster.  Lets change pace and talk about firearms that will be used to defend your property, livestock and crops.  This will probably be the AR-15 and AK-47.

Maybe its just me, but I believe that you get what you pay for, at least most to the time anyway.  If you buy the cheapest 223 or cheapest 7.62×39 on the market, then expect to get low grade performance.

Is the safety and well being of your family worth a few extra pennies per round?

I am just as guilty as the next person of buying the cheapest ammunition I can find.  Over the past few years I started buying what works.

One of the issues with changing plans, is now I have a lot of steel cased and brass cased ammunition.  For several years I was stockpiling Monarch 223 and Monarch 7.62×39.  This meant my stocks of 223 Remington and 7.62×39 was steel cased.

For the past year or so I have started stockpiling American Eagle and Federal 223 Remington, both are brass cased.

Having a mixture of steel cased and brass cased ammunition creates its own problem.  Steel cased does not expand like brass cased does.  Fire a few steel cased, the chamber gets some residue in it, fire a brass cased, the brass expands, and the case gets stuck in the chamber.

223 Remington and 7.62×39 stockpile includes:

  • Monarch 223
  • American Eagle 223
  • Federal 223
  • Monarch 7.62×39
  • China sports 7.62×39
  • Russian white box hollow point (1990s stuff) 7.62×39
  • Winchester 7.62×39
  • Norinco China north industries 7.62×39

The 7.62×39 is my favorite round for a long term SHTF survival situation. Its well suited for either protecting your property and taking deer sized game.

The 308 Winchester and the 7.62×39 are the only calibers I am stockpiling FMJ, soft-points and hunting ammunition for.

22 Long Rifle

Tied with the 7.62×39 as my favorite SHTF survival caliber, is the 22 long rifle. The 22 long rifle is probably the do all caliber. Its cheap and effective, so what more could you want?

When stockpiling 22 long rifle, I think there are 2 answers – 1, special applications; 2, what works.

Special applications with 22 long rifle includes hyper-sonic and sub-sonic.

OPSEC an issue?  Do not want to let your neighbors hear you taking small game, then use sub-sonic.

Have stray dogs or coyotes harassing your livestock, then use hyper-sonic.

Have raccoons getting into the chicken coop at night and do not want to scare the livestock, use sub-sonic.

What works in your 22 rifle may not work in your buddies rifle.  If you are buying bulk 22 long rifle, what is the failure rate?

When stockpiling 22 long rifle, it is important to test as many types of ammunition as possible, and stockpile what works best in your rifle and pistol.

My personal stockpile of 22 long rifle includes sub-sonic, bulk and good quality hyper-sonic ammunition.  In all, I have probably stockpile 4 or 5 different brands of 22 long rifle.

Handgun Ammunition

The best handgun ammunition is the one that works every single time you pull the trigger.  Some people will probably say if you buy a good quality handgun, regardless of what kind of ammunition you use it is going to work.  That is very true, but some types of ammunition is more reliable then others, and that is all there is to it.

My personal handgun ammunition stockpile includes Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) and Hollow Points (HP).

Related ArticleWhy I switched from 9mm to 45 ACP

Take your handgun out to the range and shoot it until it earns your confidence.

If the handgun has a high rate of failures with different types of ammunition, sell it or trade it in on something that works.

In Review

As complicated as article sounds, its really quit simple.

  • Stockpile what works for you
  • Stockpile whatever you can afford
  • When applicable, stockpile a good defensive round and a good hunting round
  • Stockpile ammunition that is effective on the game animals you plan on hunting

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock

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