Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

The chronic infection of crime

Anyone here play the game Half-Life 2?

When the guards were chasing gordon freeman, they would say “outbreak” from time to time.

I read somewhere that the guards said “outbreak” because criminals should be treated like a disease. The longer the criminals stayed in the community, the longer they have to spread the infection. The infection being crime.

In the case of the justice being drawn out, the system is being dragged to the knees.

Just as the immune system reacts to clear an infection, so should the justice system act swiftly to remove the infection from society.

The longer the infection stays around, the more damage it does to the system as a whole.

Instead of capturing the infection and destroying it, the legal system releases the infection back into the community to do more damage.

Society can not afford to build more prisons, or sentence people to a lifetime in prison for petty crimes, the only solution is to put the person to death after X number of crimes. Instead of three strikes and your out, it should be three strikes and you are put to death.

Three strikes and put to death might seem a little drastic to a lot of people. But what is society supposed to do to clear the criminal infection from the community? Are we supposed to let career criminals back out on the streets, to commit more crimes?

The problem with the criminal infection of society, is the legal system is a revolving door. Unlike the human immune system that cleans an infection from the body, the legal system allows infections to society to remain, spread and build up.

A few months ago there was a murder in Beaumont Texas. Come to find out, the guy who committed the murder had been in prison several times for assault. The key word there is “several times”.

Why do we allow criminals to harm our society? If someone commits 2 or 3 violent crimes, that person should be put to death. This will clear the infection, and society as a whole would be better off.

Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018