Homesteading and Survivalism

Living a simple life

Stockpiling Survival Gear at the Bug Out Location

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A few weeks ago my wife and I, and some of our friends, made a trip to the Bug Out Location for the weekend. Spending time at the BOL gives us a chance to test our survival plans, see what works, what does not work and what we need to change.

Every few months I make up a bucket of gear to bring to the Bug Out Location. Sometimes I bring tools, sometimes its flashlights, sometimes its first aid gear, chains for pulling logs,,, and so on.

I want to share with yall what I am putting together for the next load.

Trotline string – cost $4.97 for 580 feet, 235 pound tensile strength. I guess I could order some 550 cord, but that stuff cost around $8 for 100 feet. 550 cord might get added to another shipment.

We need some simple cord for tying stuff up. On the last trip to the camp, the chain that works the flap of the toilet broke. We needed some simple cord to make the flap of the toilet work. My buddy used the cord off my ear plugs to rig the toilet flap where it would work.

Nails – we are in serious need of nails at the camp. I am probably going to buy a tub of 10 penny and 12 penny nails. Not the small box of nails either, but rather a tub of nails.

Worse case situation, some kind of long term event happens, we need to build some kind of shed. Some of us chop a pine tree down, plit it into boards, but guess what, we do not have any nails.

While on the topic of nails, why not add in a couple of hammers and wedges?

Cigarette lighters – not for smoking, but for starting fires.

Even though I have around 2,000 matches at the camp, a lighter provides almost unlimited sparks. I picked up a 5 pack of large Bic lighters just to bring to the Bug Out Location.

First Aid – The never ending quest to have enough first aid items.  The dilemma I am caught in, do I stockpile isopropyl alcohol or some kind of clear whiskey? Isopropyl alcohol expires, whiskey (like vodka) never expires.

After doing some google searches I am getting conflicting information about whether isopropyl alcohol “really” expires. There is something on yahoo answers about isopropyl alcohol breaking down (oxidizing) to acetone. For long term storage, maybe everclear is better then isopropyl alcohol.

One thing is for sure, if vodka enters the blood stream, its a lot easier on the liver then isopropyl alcohol.

What is a worse case situation?  Deep wounds, blood flowing, which would be better, isopropyl alcohol or vodka or everclear? Vodka and everclear can be used for pain, isopropyl alcohol can not.

I might buy a couple of half gallons of vodka for the Bug Out Location.

Ammo cans – on the last trip to the Bug Out Location my buddy reminded me about how much ammunition he lost during Hurricane Ike.  Those plastic ammo cans do not keep flood waters out, but they hold water real good.

All the ammunition at the bug out location is being stored in plastic ammo cans.

I need to buy some 50 cal ammo cans for storing ammo at the bug out location.

During the summer time the temps inside the camp can get rather hot, during the winter time the tamps can drop to freezing. Keeping the ammunition on a shelf with drastic temps changes can not be good for the powder or primer.

The goal is to keep most of the ammunition inside ammo cans.

Flashlights – We have some hand crank flashlights at the camp and we have some battery powered lights, but the battery powdered ones keep coming up missing.

On the last trip to the camp I used a 3 D maglight to check the hot water heater. As fate would have it, the batteries were just about dead.

Using the 3 cell D maglight got me to thinking.  Instead of having a 3 D cell light, why not have a 2 D light?  The local china-mart sales D batteries in a 4 pack.  Why not buy a single 4 pack that will power 2 flashlights?

I might buy some cheap Coleman LED lights to bring to the camp as well.

The ideal situation would be to have a few solar chargers and rechargeable batteries.

Seeds – One of the things I need to stockpile at the camp is more seeds.  One of the problems, the freezer is rather small.

Worse case situation, my family and I have to bug out to the camp with no advance notice.  This means ehe only thing we have to survive on is what we have stored there ahead of time.  I want to make sure we are able to grow a garden during every season.

Some of the seeds I want to store at the bug out location – radishes, beans, peas, squash, zucchini, corn, turnip greens, rutabaga, spinach,, only to name a few.

Water well – One of the major drawbacks to the camp is that the water from of the current well is not safe to drink. It’s a hand dug well that is close to 100 years old. Over the past century the well has slowly filled in with dirt, leaves and the occasional feral cat.

Hopefully, sometime this fall my family and I will drive a new well.  In order to prepare for the new well I want to stockpile some PVC pipe ahead of time.  This means I need to get some 3 inch or 4 inch pipe up to the camp.

22 long rifle – Do you really want to bet the survival of your family on the cheapest 22 ammunition you can find?  Is putting food on the table worth an extra few dollars?  The answer to those two questions changed my whole outlook on stockpiling 22 long rifle for a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation.

After stockpiling several thousands rounds of bulk 22 long riffle, it is time to upgrade.  From here on out it is either subsonic or high grade hypersonic ammunition.

Subsonic for hunting small game, hypersonic is for defense of property.

I think that is about it for now.

Post your opinions and suggestions.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock

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