Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Springtime survival gear preps

Springtime survival gear preps
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teotwawki survival gearSpring is here, that means its time to stock up on seasonal preps.  The local feed and fertilizer stores are getting their seed shipments in, as well as baby chickens, fertilizer,,, and so on.

Some stores carry farm supplies all year long, some places carry them on a seasonal basis.  If at all possible, find a place in your area that carries farm and livestock supplies all year long.  Here in Jasper Texas we have 3 feed and fertilizer stores that carry farm supplies all year long.

Pickle’s
Circle Three Feed
Farmers Feed

Pickle’s carries a wide assortment of seed, pesticide and fertilizer. If you want to buy corn seed, this is the place to go.

Circle Three Feed carries a lot of farm and livestock supplies. If you want to buy chickens, feed, deer corn, this is a good place to go.

Farmers Feed carries a lot of everything. I have bought deer corn, chicks, seeds, 16 gallon drums,,, all kinds of stuff from Farmers Feed.

Even if the stores carry supplies all year long, there are still items that are seasonal, such as seeds and chicks.  If you want chicks and if you want seed, get down to a local feed store and stockup before the seasonal stuff is sold out.

Recent survival gear additions:

13 chicks
2 food dispensers for the chicks
2 water dispensers for the chicks
2 – 1 pound packages of contender snap beans
10 pound bag chick starter feed
1 pound Mississippi purple hull pink eye
Several ounces rutabaga
Several ounces round dutch cabbage
1 pound Roma II snap bean
Several ounces giant noble spinach
1 pound improved pinto
Several ounces straight neck squash
4 – 26 ounce great value iodized salt
1/2 gallon lamp oil (kerosene)
Justincase family first aid kit – 130 pieces

Stuff like salt, lamp oil and the first aid kit are not seasonal items.  But since they were bought within the past few weeks I decided to include them in the list.

Chickens and chicken supplies

If you are planning on surviving some kind of long term SHTF survival situation, then your plans should include food production. Stockpiling rice, beans, oats, corn, freeze dried foods,,, is fine and dandy. The problem with having a static food supply, it “is” going to run out sooner or later. To expand my families food supply, my wife and I decided to get some chickens.

With the chickens we will have a steady supply of eggs for protein, and if bad turns to worse, we can eat the chickens. Eating the chickens would be a last ditch effort, as I would rather use the chickens for breeding purposes to make more chickens.

This is my first attempt at raising chickens in over 20 years. The last time I had chickens was back around 1989, 1990 and 1991. Over the past 20+ years I have forgotten a lot about raising chickens, but I am sure things will come back.

A lot of people plan on obtaining chickens or other livestock during a long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI survival situation. Even though a lot of survivalist talk about obtaining farm animals, a good majority of those people do not have the tools on hand to care for the animals that might be obtained.

How many survivalist have the items needed to take care of gaots, pigs or chickens? How about something as simple as a chicken feeder or a chicken waterer?

During 2011 I invested a lot of time and effort into fishing gear, making noodles, running trotlines,,, and the such.

2012 will be dedicated to raising chickens and planting a home garden.

Seeds

If you want to buy seeds from a local feed and fertilizer store, now is the time to do so. Feed stores get a limited stock during the spring time months, and demand is high. Get your seeds early or run the risk of losing out.

In 2011 my wife and I planted a nice sized garden at the camp. Then along came the drought of 2011. What did sprout was eaten by the deer and rabbits, the rest died from lack of rain.

The seeds I bought over the past couple of weeks includes greens, squash, beans and peas. If you are going to stockpile seeds, at the very least stockpile seeds that will provide a balanced diet, items that are easy to store or easy to preserve.

Other Items

Some of the other items I picked up lately are salt, first aid kit, and 1/2 gallon of kerosene. None of the items are seasonal, but I decided to include them in the article and video anyway.

While on a recent camping trip a buddy of mine showed me a first aid kit he pimped out. He will probably tell him that I am copying him, but oh well, that is the way things are. Once he sees my chicken coop, he will probably copy my coop plans.

Post your comments in this forum thread about stockpiling springtime SHTF survival gear preps.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018