Homesteading and Survivalism

Ramblings Of A Bored Survivalist

Archive for June, 2011

Stockpiling fishing supplies for SHTF

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 30, 2011 Comments Off

As I have said in several forum post about stockpiling survival gear for SHTF, I think fishing supplies should be at the top of the list. That is, unless you live in a desert or hundreds of miles from a water source. In some kind of long term SHTF survival situation, fishing could be an important food source. The better prepared you are to utilize fish as a food source, the better your chances for success.

On the way home from work today, my wife and I stopped by Ward’s Outdoor Supply in Jasper Texas. The store is snuggled in the corner of an Exxon gas station at the northeast corner of Hwy 96 and Hwy 190. To be honest, when I entered the store, I was not expected much, but I was pleasantly surprised. In fact, I was very surprised at the wide selection of fishing supplies that Ward’s had in stock.


This is what I picked up:




A slave to the government

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 29, 2011 Comments Off

In a 1942 US Supreme Court ruling, it was determined that Ohio farmer Roscoe Filburn could not grow wheat on his own property. Congress, under the interstate commerce act, had the power to stop Roscoe from growing his own wheat, instead of buying it on the national market. By growing his own wheat, Roscoe Filburn  [ Read More ]




Bucket for trotlines and noodles

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 27, 2011 Comments Off

SHTF fishing supplies for catfish and trotlinesA few weeks ago I posted an article about fishing with juglines after SHTF. One of the problems is organizing the noodles and trot lines so they are easy to deploy. In an effort to keep everything together, I bought a 5 gallon bucket. The bucket provided a way to keep the noodles and trot line string together, but it lacked compartments for holding hooks, weights, swivels and leader material. This problem was fixed on Fathers Day.

On Fathers day my Grand kids picked me out a lid for my 5 gallon bucket. The lid is made by Plano, its 2 sided, has 6 compartments in the top tray, and the tray is removable for access to a storage compartment. The compartments are large enough for hooks, weights, swivels,,,, anything that you might need for setting up a jugline or trot line.

Along with the trotline and jugline material for catfishing, I am going to include some supplies for perch fishing, and maybe some stuff for catfishing.




Buying fishing gear

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 26, 2011 Comments Off

Survivalist fishing gearWhile my wife and I were doing our Sunday shopping at the local china-mart, I went to the sporting goods section to look at the fishing supplies. Choices, choices, so many choices. Should I get some perching supplies, or stuff for catfishing, bass fishing,,,,,. Do I want supplies for artificial or live bait.

A lot of survivalist stockpile freeze dried foods, food in mylar bags, canned goods, seeds for a garden and ammunition for hunting. One thing that I do not see talked about a lot is fishing supplies. Maybe fishing supplies is a given, that everyone should have fishing supplies stockpiled, or maybe its overlooked by a lot of people?

Fishing supplies bought today:

1. Zoom artificial lizard, 6″ long, cotton candy color – for bass fishing

2. Eagle claw hooks, box of 40, size 1/0 – for catfish, noodles and trot lines

3. Water Gremlin split shot weight – for perch fishing

4. Eagle claw Barrel swivel with interlocking snap, size 5 – for catfishing and jug lines




How to organize a tackle box

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 25, 2011 Comments Off

How to organize a tackle box survival fishing supplies Last night I was going through my tackle box trying to get it a little better organized. The problem was that I had hooks and weights spread out over different section of the tackle box. The top of the box is mostly lures and a few weights and hooks. With the bottom of the box being an assortment of different hooks, weights and other supplies.

After looking through my tackle for a little while, I realized that I fish for about 3 different types of fish – perch, bass and catfish.

For perch I use split weight and small hooks. To organize my tackle box for perch fishing gear, I bought a small double sided container. On one side of the container goes hooks, on the other side goes split weights.

For bass fishing I use artificial bait, like worms and lizards. A bottom section of my tackle box is dedicated to artificial worms, on top of the worm is a small double sided container like what I keep the perch fishing stuff in. In this container hooks go on one side and weights go on the other side. Unlike the round split weights for perch fishing, the weights used for bass fishing are oblong split weights used for making a texas rig so the bait does not get hung up in the weeds.

For catfish I use a little bit larger hooks and some teardrop weights. A loop is tied in the fishing line, the end of the loop is inserted through the wire on the weight, then wrapper around the end of the weight. This makes the weight easy to take on and off the line.





What a survivalist does on a weekend

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 24, 2011 Comments Off

Tentative plans, nothing set in stone right now. Friday night my wife and I are having a couple of friends over for a movie. Saturday morning I have a meeting for my Master Naturalist class at Martin Dies State Park Saturday evening supposed to go to my parents farm to help my cousin build a  [ Read More ]




Categories: Random Ramblings

Missing gear from bug out location

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 21, 2011 Comments Off

You know what really sucks, is when your trying to stockpile survival gear at the bug out location, and stuff keeps coming up missing. Awhile back the liner of my parka went missing, pair of cold weather gloves, shotgun shells, and now some lithium batteries and a LED flashlight are missing.

Its not that someone is breaking into the location and stealing the stuff, I think its more along the lines of someone “borrowing” the supplies and not bringing it back or replacing it.

Over the past 15+ years, I have been making it a point to keep certain types of survival gear at the bug out location. Whether its blankets, flashlights, knives, ammo, first aid supplies, water filter, hand tools, eating utensils,,,,,, I like to keep a general stockpile of gear at the camp. I don’t know how much time and money has been invested over the past decade alone to make sure we have plenty of survival gear for some kind of SHTF situation.

Now for a video about a bug out exercise on Labor Day of 2010. Labor day was used to test my families bug out plans.




Ideas for a get home bag

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 20, 2011 Comments Off

Get Home Bag Ideas

If I had to walk home, here are some items that I would like to have in my get home bag.

32 ounce water bottle
Rain poncho – even a light duty one
LED light, something like a Surefire G2X Pro
Mainstay rations
Road map
Phone number / contact list
Rope – 550 cord
Multi-tool
Small first aid kit
Paper, pen and sharpie / felt tip magic marker
Money – at least $20

One of the first packs that comes to mind is the Maxpedition Noatak




Wildfire in Jasper Texas

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 19, 2011 Comments Off

On Saturday June 18, 2011 the residents of Jasper Texas got the dreaded news, a wildfire has broken out in the Northern part of the county. Over the past couple of months Jasper county has been under a burn ban. But for some reason, people still continue to burn outdoors.

A few weeks ago a fire broke out close to Sand creek park on the south side of Dam B. After a couple of days the fire was contained. But this new fire was different, it was in a part of the county that was difficult to access.

jasper texas wildfire



Fishing in slews and gators

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 17, 2011 Comments Off

Alligator Magnolia Ridge Park Steinhagen ReservoirShort version: This morning my daughter and I went to a local park to go fishing. After a few minutes a 6 foot gator showed up to see what was going on.

Over the course of about 15 – 20 minutes, the gator slowly worked its way to within about 8 – 10 feet of the bank. the day was getting hot, and the gator was getting a little too close, so my daughter and I decided to pack up and go home.

Long Version: The day started off around 10:30am when my daughter decided it was time to drag herself out of bed so we could finally go fishing. I had already been up for a couple of hours, had gotten my shower, brushed my teeth, and even made a trip to the store to pick up a couple of low carb blue rock star energy drinks.

While I was waiting for my daughter to get ready, I went through my tackle box, sorted through some of my fishing gear, rounded up the fishing poles, loaded a small ice chest with drinking water into my truck,,,,, finally we were ready to go.

As we were driving out to the park, the wind was hitting the side of my truck pretty good. With the wind like it was, I figured the water around Martin Dies State Park would be stirred up pretty good. So my daughter and I changed plans, and went to Magnolia Ridge Park.




Cooking after TEOTWAWKI

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 13, 2011 Comments Off

cooking after shtfWhat is your long term cooking solution post SHTF? We are not talking 2, 3 or even 5 days after the power goes out, we are talking about cooking for the long term – 1 year, 2 years, or even 3 years.

Most of the people that visit the forum know about my long term survival cooking solution, its a pit on a trailer with a cooking surface 6 feet 9 inches long and 29 inches across. The main pit is built out of a 250 gallon butane tank, the smoker and fire box are out of a 250 gallon tank. When I built my pit, I wanted something that was big enough to put a whole hog or deer on. With the smoker, maybe I can even make my own sausage.

Not everyone is going to have a pit with a built in smoker, so what are your choices.

Charcoal grill that can also use wood
Fire ring
Propane grill – but propane will run out sooner or later
Single burner propane or butane stove
Wood stove
Fireplace
Solar oven




Jug lines after SHTF

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 10, 2011 Comments Off

Drop Lines for long term survival shtf situationBack at the end of November a buddy of mine and I went on a 3 day camping trip on the Angelina river close to Jasper, Texas. While we were camping, we took the boat and explorer some of the slews in the area. As we were heading into the slew, there were some jug lines in the water. This got me to thinking, why couldn’t someone use jug lines for harvesting fish during a long term survival situation?

What do we need to make up some drop lines / jug lines?

Spool of trot line string
Hooks
Weights
Swivels – optional
Spool of monofilament line, something like 20# test
Something that floats – 1 gallon plastic bottle, noodle from local china mart, something like that.

When I started working on this jug line project, I wanted the system to be modular. Meaning, all of the parts needed to be easily replaceable. To accomplish this, loops where used in the trot line string.

Tie a loop knot in the end of the trot line string. Make the loop maybe 1.5 – 2 inches long.

Back up maybe 18 inches from the end of the trot line string, and tie another loop knot maybe 1.5 inches long. This is where you can attach the swivel. Run the end of the end of loop through one end of the swivel, and over the opposite end. The swivel should now be attached to the drop line. For added security, pull some slack through the eye of the swivel, then run the loop through the eye and over the end again. If you have done everything right, there should be 2 loops running through the eye of the swivel.




Growing dusty

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 9, 2011 Comments Off

My life has grown dusty.  As I look around my office at work, and my desk at home I can see dust building up here and there.  The dust is a subtle reminder that life goes on, even when we do nothing or very little. As I look back on my life, I used to  [ Read More ]




The idea of strategic default

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 9, 2011 Comments Off

The idea behind a strategic default is, if you owe more money then your house is worth, then just walk away. This works well with people who can rebuild their credit, and who can afford to walk away from their investment. But for people who take pride in owning a house, pride in paying off their debts, pride in owning property, strategic default is not an option.

Who do those homeowners think they are they can just walk away from a loan because their house is worth less today then it was worth last year? Lets compare the “walk away” attitude to the rest of life.

Buying a car or truck – Just because your car value drops, does that mean that you stop paying the note? From the time I bought my Toyota truck, to the time that I paid it off, it had lost about 1/2 – 1/3 of its value. But I still paid it off. If we compare a housing strategic default to a car/truck, then I should have stopped paying on my truck long before I had it paid off.

A totally unrelated video about the Maxpedition Noatak




Stockpiling cheese, butter and canned meats

Posted by Kevin Felts On June 8, 2011 Comments Off

Looking for some canned meats and canned cheeses? Well, I have a place you should look at, and that is CampingSurvival.com. CampingSurvival.com has a wide selection of Yoders canned meats and bacon.

Yoder’s Canned Beef
Yoder’s Canned Pork Sausage
Yoder’s Canned Hot Dogs – “Grill Delights”
Yoder’s Canned Pork Chunks
Yoder’s Canned Turkey Chunks,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

To only name a few

http://www.campingsurvival.com/camechbu.html