Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Deer Season Daypack Loadout

Deer Season Daypack Loadout
Please Rate This Article

Deer season is here, instead of grabbing a pack, throwing some random gear in and heading out to the woods, lets take a look at some items that should be considered.  The way I look at it, your pack needs to contain everything you need to track a wounded deer, find your way back back to the truck after dark or spend an unexpected night in the woods.

Basic Daypack

This could be anything from a school book bag, to a good quality pack like a Maxpedition Sitka or Maxpedition Noatak.  You need something that is not going to tear apart when your tracking a deer as the last bit of the sunlight fades away.  For my current load out I am using the Maxpedition Noatak.

Wilderness survival kit

GPS & Compass

When you get off the trail back to the truck, you might need something to help find your way.  Or worse yet, if you and your buddies have to track a deer through a thicket in pitch black dark.

Mark the truck before you head out and set the GPS to go back to the truck before you head out.  This will tell you how far off the way point is.

Get familiar with your GPS and compass “before” you have to use it.  Make sure you understand the difference between heading and bearing, and which one you need to set your compass to.

Learn how to set and read a compass.

If the GPS says you need a bearing of 130 degrees, would you know how to set the compass to 130 degrees in order to find your way to where you want to go?

TOPO Map

When possible, I like to have a TOPO map of the area.  A GPS is nice, but electronics can fail, batteries can go dead,,,, a physical map is difficult to beat.

But, in order for everything to come together, you have to know how to use a map, GPS and compass.  Having a TOPO map in one hand and a compass in the other hand does not do any good if you do not know how to use them.

Utility, Skinning or Survival Knife

Something a little larger then a pocket knife. In the case you have to spend a night in the woods, a good knife can be used to build a shelter.

In my case I use a Gerber Big Rock from Rocky National.

Gerber Big Rock Features:

Textured SoftGrip overmold ensures secure grip
Ergonomic contoured handle
Full Tang, fixed blade
Lanyard attachment
Nylon Sheath includes protective insert

Gerber Big Rock Specs:

Overall Length: 9.4″
Blade Length: 4.5″
Weight: 6.3 oz.
Blade Material: 440A stainless steel
Blade Style: Drop Point
Blade Type: Fine edge
Handle Material: SoftGrip overmold over a hard substrate
Sheath: Ballistic Nylon with protective liner

Rest Of The Hunting Gear List

Cell phone
Toilet paper in zip-lock bag
32 ounce water bottle
Digital Camera – I like cameras that use AA batteries, they act as spare batteries for the GPS
Incest repellant
Hand sanitizer – also helps to get a fire started
Bible – King James version old and new testament.  Bible measures 5 x 3 x 3/4 inches
Flashlight – Surefire 6Px Pro. Dual output 15/200 lumens and only weighs 5.2 ounces
Pen for filling out the tags on the hunting license and for leaving/taking notes
Pencil for when the pen fails, or you need some shavings to start a fire
Twisty off a loaf of bread to secure the tag to the animal. Take 3 or 4 of them.
Lighter for building a fire
Cord for making a shelter
Signal mirror
Snacks
Multi-tool
Cover scent – such as doe urine
Rain poncho – not only for keeping you dry but it can be made into a shelter.

With this load out we should have basic list of wilderness survival tools:

Shelter – rain poncho

Food – snacks

Water – 32 ounce water bottle

Fire – toilet paper, pencil shavings and lighter

Warmth – solar blanket and clothing that the hunter should be wearing

Communications – cell phone and signal mirror.  Texting with a cell phone uses less power then making a call.  If you get lost, send a text with the phone, when you get signal the phone will send the text.  A lot of people will keep an eye on their cell phone wondering when they will get signal.  Instead of checking the phone and using battery power, use text messaging.

 Full Disclosure:  I received the Gerber Big Rock and Maxpedition Noatak at no cost to myself. Even though I received the items at no cost, I try not to let that influence my opinions.

Related Post

Maxpedition Water Bottle Holder and Mini Rollypoly Need to carry plenty of water on that pack of yours?  Looking for a way to carry 32 ounce water bottles instead of canteens? While looking for a wa...
Those Late Season Whitetail Bucks Season drawing to an end? Have not taken a deer yet? If you play your cards right, there is no reason not to get a deer towards the end of deer season...
Maxpedition Falcon-II and Pygmy Falcon-II When looking for a daypack, or lightweight pack for an overnight trip, there are 2 packs that should be seriously considered - and that is the Maxpedi...
A Lesson In Having Navigational Gear Close At Hand While my son and I were fishing on the Angelina River near Jasper, Texas, I learned a lesson on having navigational gear close at hand. What happened ...
Part 2 of the Maxpedition Versipack Review This is part 2 of a review on the Maxpedition Versipack. The first part of the review can be found at this link - Maxpedition Proteus Versipack Review...
The following two tabs change content below.
Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018