Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Well rounded survival plans

Well rounded survival plans
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survivalistI think there is a tendency to focus more on preps, and less on being self-sufficient. Who “really” wants to check on the rabbits, goats, chickens and pigs after working 8 – 10 hours? In todays urban sprawl, finding land to have a small farm is rather difficult as well.

For a survivalist to be self-sufficient, their not only going to need fruits and vegetables, their also going to need meats, protein, eggs and fat. The problem is, for most people living in the city, having farm animals is not an option. So its a win-lose situation – people move to the city to get a job, but have to leave their farm life behind.

Here in Texas, its estimated that the average people has been removed from farm life for at least 2 – 3 generations. If some kind of long term SHTF situation happens, people will have a lot of learning to do.  Those already living on a farm might adjust well, but those used to urban life and instant satisfaction might be a little disappointed.

In the rural areas where I live, its not uncommon to see rows of pecan trees from the first settlers. But now, we are more worried about planting pine trees to sell for timber, then planting fruit trees.

Its not enough to just buy preps, without developing a well rounded long term survival plan. Stockpiling rice, beans, pasta, powered milk and pancake mix in mylar bags is not a long term survival plan, its a temporary survival plan. Buying superpails, making homemade superpails, stockpiling MREs, storing food in mylar bags just prolongs the inevitable, and that is running out of food.

Even though the words “self-sufficient” sound nice, its impossible to be totally self-sufficient. Even people in ancient times had trade routes, with some of the routes spanning thousands of miles. Even though someone might have everything they need right now, sooner or later its going to run out.

True long term survival plans not only include being as self-sufficient as possible, but your neighbor being self-sufficient, and the two of you trading supplies. Where one person grows squash, and other person grows okra, another might grow spinach,,,,, and everyone trade for the items that they need.

As wonderful as “bugging out to the wilderness” sounds, its going to be a short lived dream. To test the bug out theory, just got camping for 3 or 4 days, try to find your food, find safe drinking water, preserve your food,,,,,,, your probably going to catch Shigella or E.Coli and die. Either that or your family is going to starve.

Last December a buddy of mine and I went camping for 3 days on the Angelina River, which is close to my house. We were there for 3 days, and I did not see a single hog or deer. There were plenty of tree rats and catfish, but your not going to live off of that very long.

Video from that 3 day camping trip:

The goal of a serious survivalist should be to develop well rounded plans:

Stockpiling survival gear is not a well rounded plan.
Buying #10 cans is not a well rounded survival plan
Buying superpails is not a well rounded plan
Stockpiling ammo is not a well rounded plan
Having a bug out bag is not a well rounded plan
Having a generator is not a well rounded plan
Having a garden is not a well rounded plan
Stockpiling seeds is not a well rounded plan
Having a bug out location is not a well rounded plan.
Having barter items is not a well rounded plan.
Having cache tubes is not a well rounded plan.
Knowing your evacuation route is not a well rounded plan.

Its when the pieces come together that a plan becomes well rounded. A well rounded plan is like a circle, with each part of your survival preps being a small part of the circle. The larger your circle, the more rounded your circle is, the better.

Lets talk about the sharp edges of a survival plan. This is when you have plenty of canned goods for 3 or 4 people, SHTF, and you have 10 friends and family members on your door step. Then whatcha gonna do? Another sharp edge might be when you have canned goods, and tons of garden seed, but nowhere to plant a garden. Plenty of food, but no source of safe drinking water. Plenty of dried beans and rice, but no stove to cook it and no water to boil it.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018