Homesteading and Survivalism

Ramblings Of A Bored Survivalist

Archive for March, 2010

Survival camp example

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 29, 2010 Comments Off

The worse has happened – some kind of pandemic disease is whipping out mankind, or a nuke strike has launched this nation in chaos, or something else has happened.

You now have to leave the city. So, where do you go? Some emergencies are regional – such as a hurricane or wild fires. So staying with friends or family might be an option.

For the sake of this article, lets discuss this topic as if its world wide. So now what do you do?





Are you a prepper or a survivalist

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 26, 2010 Comments Off

My opinion – preppers and survivalist are not the same thing, there is a big difference. Preppers – get into survivalism because its the “cool” thing to be doing. “Oh look at me, I have 2 – 3 months of stockpiled food.” They might have gone down to the local store and bought 50 pounds  [ Read More ]




Fruit trees and the urban survivalist

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 25, 2010 Comments Off

Fruit trees are the friend of the urban survivalist. Unlike a garden, you do not have to replant the fruit tree every year, during the spring your neighbors will be jealous of the beautiful blooms, dwarf fruit trees can be planted just about anywhere, and some types of fruit trees are high producers. Meaning, that  [ Read More ]




Fuel lines after a disaster

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 24, 2010 0 Comments

As soon as the public gets information that a disaster is looming, people go into panic buying mode. Expect food, bottled water, camping supplies, bread, snacks, camp stoves, charcoal,,,,, well, if its on the shelf, expect people to buy it.

There is one thing that is sold out very quickly, and that is fuel. Before you know it the fuel lines are out to the street, and tempers start to flare.

This video was taken after hurricane Ike hit southeast Texas. People were blocking the roads so other traffic was not able to get through. I did not see any road rage, but its very possible it did happen.




Floods from nautral disasters

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 24, 2010 Comments Off

This is the intersection of HWY 87 and chemical road, which is between Orange and Bridge City, Texas. 2 major intersections which were blocked by debris and water from Hurricane Ike. Keep in mind, this intersection is about 20 inland from the Gulf of Mexico. As far as anyone could remember, this part of Orange  [ Read More ]




3 day bug out test

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 23, 2010 Comments Off

Back in July of 2008, (July 4th weekend to be exact), my family and I went up to the deer camp. While the kids were having fun playing in the creek, I was taking notes. To my family it was just a relaxing weekend. To me, it was time to test some stuff and take notes.

Infant Formula / baby food: While we were at the camp my step daughter ran out of powdered formula. Its no big deal, we just drove the 15 – 20 miles back to town. On the flip side, what if we could not make the trip? What if there was no store with baby food stocks?




Fuel storage

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 22, 2010 Comments Off

Here is what I store most of my fuel in. These drums hold 16 gallons each, but I only fill them with 15 gallons of fuel. The first thing people usually say – your not supposed to store fuel in plastic. Ok, then what about the plastic 5 gallon gas cans from the local hardware  [ Read More ]




What groups would survive

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 21, 2010 Comments Off

Through out history its been shown that certain social groups are more likely to survive then other groups The rich – the rich have been able to move outside the affected areas, or have been able to buy the resources that they needed. During the black death of 1348 – 1350, the rich secluded themselves  [ Read More ]




Rotating your seed stockpile

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 21, 2010 Comments Off

One of the questions that is asked a lot on the forums, is how long will seeds stay good? One example to the answer of that question is the Doomsday Seed Vault. This seed vault is designed to keep seeds frozen for centuries. Some types of seeds will stay good for decades. While other types of seeds can stay good for hundreds of years – if kept frozen.




Pecan trees

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 21, 2010 Comments Off

Years ago, homesteads would have pecan trees planted rows in various places around the farm. Now these trees are reduced to a rarity. If you see an empty field, with a bunch of old pecan trees planted in rows, chances are an old homestead used to be there years ago. The old timers would collect the pecans and eat then through the winter. These are an excellent long lasting, easily store able food.

If you ever eat a fresh pecan, you will realize how nasty the packaged pecans from the store really are. Home made pecan pie is hard to beat. Well, you can not beat it.

The pecans have started falling, so its time to pick em and put em up. The pecan grows inside of a larger shell. The shell splits open and the pecan will fall out.




Move on you have enough gas

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 20, 2010 Comments Off

This is a real story, as it was told to me. As far as I know it based on actual events. Location – Lufkin, Texas Date – a couple of days after Hurricane Rita passed through. The story – this guy was at a gas station filling up several 55 gallon drums. Gasoline was already  [ Read More ]




Coleman Perfectflow Stove

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 20, 2010 0 Comments

Coleman Perfectflow StoveIt was the Sunday morning of the opening weekend of Spring Break 2010. My wife and I got up, setup the 15+ year old Coleman stove and started to cook breakfast. For its age, the stove was doing good, but it was just cooking a little slow. In all, we had about 8 hungry people standing around waiting on their food.

My buddy Lynn made the comment that he had a new propane Coleman stove that he wanted to try out. The conversation went something like this:

Kevin – Watching the bacon cook on the stove.
Lynn – I have a new stove I wold like to try out.
Kevin – Break it out then, this one is taking too long.
Lynn – Well, I did not want to step on your manhood.
Kevin – I’am hungry, get that stove out so we can cook faster.

So Lynn walked over to his SUV, got a brand new Coleman Perfectflow Stove out of the back, and set it up. Within minutes we had bacon, boudain, sausage and eggs cooking.




Some bug out plans

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 19, 2010 Comments Off

Bugging out of a major city sounds a lot easier then it actually is. Chances are the gas stations are going to be empty, and the roads are going to be packed. One of the keys to getting out a city safely, is to either leave early or leave late. But either way, try to  [ Read More ]




Survivalist Water Filter Options

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 19, 2010 Comments Off

Why should Survivalist worry about water filters? Because when the city water supply stops, the water in the local lakes and streams may not be safe to drink. Most survivalist have stockpiled water, and that is fine – there is nothing wrong with stockpiling water. But you need some kind of solution for after your stockpiles of water run out. A lot of people might say “I’ll just dig a well if I need water” – ok, lets get back to reality. Most of people are not going to dig a well overnight.

Here is short list of waterborne diseases and parasites:
Cryptosporidium
Cholera
E. Coli
Dysentery
Salmonellosis
Polio
Legionnaires’ disease




On the topic of handcrank flashlights

Posted by Kevin Felts On March 18, 2010 Comments Off

Lets talk about handcrank flashlights for a little bit. This topic might have been discussed a lot, but its good to have a refresher.

Over the past few years I have been trying to stock up on those hand crank flashlights and lanterns. But instead of having a bunch of them at my home (which I do), I have been bringing some of them to “the camp”.

When my family and I go to the camp, sometimes its after dark when we get there. After we arrive, I will grab a flashlight to go turn on the propane. I do not want to have to worry about dead batteries in the flashlight.

There have been a few time that thunder storms have knocked out power at the camp. I do not like looking around for extra batteries in the dark – especially when we have mouse traps set out.

Its very convent to grab a flashlight, shake or give it a couple of twist, and you have instant light.

Here is one of the issues, it might be 2 – 4 months between trips to the camp. That gives the batteries in the flashlights a long time to go dead.

Also, if you leave those cheap batteries in your flashlights -the ones that leak acid – your gear can be ruined before you know it. Just the other day I found an AM/FM radio that the batteries had leaked in and ruined the device. The radio was a cheap one, so its not a lot of money lost, but it is a piece of equipment that will need to be replaced.

I have heard of long term storage batteries, ones that you can keep stored for decades,,,, but why? I see no real reason to invest in stuff like that. They are going to go dead after you put them in the flashlight anyway.

The crank flashlights make good hand outs to the kids. If the light gets set down and the batteries go dead, just give it a few shakes or twist. This past weekend while on a camping trip with my daughter, I gave her a twist flashlight to keep in her tent with her. I told her to twist the end to charge it up, and she was like “ok, no problem.”