Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Making bug out plans

Making bug out plans
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Flooded roads from Hurricane IkeSome type of disaster has either arrived or is heading your way – whether its an earthquake, hurricane, food shortages due to a new disease outbreak,,,,, you and your family need to get out of the city. You have made plans to stay at a bug out location with some friends, but the problem is getting out of the city.

Fuel – the very first problem your going to run into is having enough fuel to get out. Once the panic buying starts, fuel is going to be one of the first things people buy up. Everyone will be filling up their gas cans, cars, trucks, generators, 55 gallon drums,,,, and as a result, the gas stations will be cleaned out. The first people to leave the cities will help finish off the fuel supplies in rural areas. So don’t think that your going to find a gas station in a small town to get fuel, its not going to happen, everyone else will beat you to it.

Maps – as the major roadways become clogged with cars and trucks, your going to need to find an alternate route. When parts of southeast Texas evacuated for Hurricane Ike and Hurricane Rita, people from Houston, Port Arthur, Bridge City, Lumberton, Orange,,,, sat in line for hours. On high 69/96/287 leaving Port Arthur, Texas – people were running out of gas sitting on the highway. The highway department had to send tanker trucks out to fill peoples cars and trucks up with fuel to keep the lines moving. What normally took a 1 hour drive, took more like 10 hours.  If you know a route around the major highways – take it.

Food and water – A lot of people pack clothes, toys, DVD players, even TV’s and other non survival items instead of food and water. Have enough food and water for everyone for at least 4 days. Dont think your going to stop at the first wal-mart and stock up there, because its already going to be cleaned out.

Have a place to go – Most people leaving their home have no clue as to where they are going. They drive from town to town looking for a hotel room, food, water, supplies,,,,. Most find theirselves out of money and sleeping in their cars rather quickly.

Bring portable shelter– like a tent and sleeping bags. If you and your family are unable to find a hotel/motel then maybe you can camp in a state / national park – hey its better then nothing. If your family ends up in a shelter, having yourown sleeping bags will be better then taking blankets from people who need them.

Have a way to cook – bring a portable grill. Even if you have to use twigs and sticks from a road side park, its still a way to cook. A portable grill and the hot meals it provides can be a real morale booster. Stopping at a rest stop, and cooking a hot meal can be a real moral booster.

Never underestimate the power of hot food, and the effect it can have on people.

Good quality ice chest – I personally like the Coleman 5 or 7 day extreme ice chest. In May of 2008 a buddy of mine got married on the beach. My Coleman 5 day extreme ice chest sat in the back of my truck – in full lightlight – for 3 days and still had ice in it.

Keep a couple of frozen one gallon bottles of water in the deep freezer. These can take a day or two to thaw out and will keep your food cold longer then a bag of ice. Plus you can drink the water once it thaws. Having your own ice will be nice when the stores are sold out.

Hand sanitizer and toilet paper – bring plenty of both.  When your family stops at a rest area, chances are there will no toilet paper or soap – its going to be cleaned out by the people that came before you.

Communications – if there is going to be more then 1 truck or car traveling together, get some citizens band radios – like a hand held unit.  Cell phone circuits will be overloaded with traffic, and its going o be doubtful that your going to be able to use the cell phone to call someone.  Have some kind of backup communications.

Written names, addresses and phone numbers – Write the information down instead of having it only stored in your smart phone.  Electronic devices can fail, pen and paper rarely fails.

Drive your evacuation / bug out route before hand – take the time to drive the route before hand and get familiar with the route.

Dealing with pets – get a pet carrier.  Make it easy on everyone else, and put your pet in a carrier.  One time my family and I were driving somewhere with a small dog, and the dog started throwing up.  The smell of the vomit made everyone in the truck gag, and then we had to clean the vomit off the kids clothes.  It would have been a lot nicer if the dog out have thrown up on the plastic floor of its carrier, then on my kids legs.

Post your comments in this thread about bugging out.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018