Remote bug out location

There is a theory that has been going around the survival community for decades, and at one time I subscribed to it, but not any more.

The theory goes like this – if there is some kind of wide spread disaster, I am just going to grab my bug out bag, and bug out to the wilderness. From there, my family and I will live in peace as society falls apart. When everything has passed, my family and I will return and help re-build.

Here are some of the reasons why I no longer subscribe to the bug out to the wilderness theory:

Ehrlichiosis
Lyme Disease
Rocky Mountain spotted fever
Tularemia
E. Coli
Cryptosporidium
Dysentery
Vitamin Deficiencies
Culture Shock – that may not be the correct term, but its going to be used anyway
Frost Bite
Heat Stroke
Heat Exhaustion
Only to name a few,,,,,,,,,.

Back in December of 2010 a buddy of mine and I went on a 3 day camping trip on a local river. During those 3 days I did not see a single deer or wild hog. The only wild game that we saw was fish and some squirrels.  It seems to me that the people who plan on bugging out to the wilderness have not tested their plans, and do not understand how difficult finding food actually is.

One thing that I have noticed, people who subscribe to the “bug out to the wilderness” theory, usually do not have a grasp on wilderness diseases and how they are spread.

All it takes is one tick bite, and the person can contract a number of tick borne infections.

All it takes is one sip of contaminated water, and the victim has some kind of water borne infection.

You can not take someone (like a teenager) out of their comfort zone, take them out to the wilderness, put them in a tent, and expect them to be happy – its not going to happy. The only thing that situation will do, is make matters worse.

On July 16 – 17, 2010, my son, my son-in-law and I went on a camping trip along the Angelina River – which is close to Jasper, Texas. The day time temps were in the mid – upper 90s, with night time temps in the mid 80s. At one point the heat got so bad that I was getting disoriented. Thank goodness the river was right there – so all 3 of us jumped in and cooled off. The question is, what if there was no river too cool off in? With little to no shade, and no way to cool off, heat related problems can be a real issue.

Bug Out Location VS Bugging Out To The Wilderness

Lets say that you have a nice Bug Out Location picked out – its close to water, has lots of wilderness for hunting and foraging – keep in mind that primitive man did not stay in one location year round.

The life of a hunter-gather revolves around being able to move from one location to another. Staying in one location for very long will deplete your sources of roots, berries and wild foods. Even if you are on a river, man can not live on fish alone. Sooner or later, your going to have to relocate to find new food sources.

With an established Bug Out Location you should have renewable resources, ways to cook, a garden, wildlife, and fruit trees.

At least with staying at home, survivalist can stockpile supplies – food, water, water filters, first aid supplies, stockpile seeds, have a garden, stay in touch with friends and family members, sleep in your own bed,,,.

Real survival plans should start with a realistic approach, and a realistic plan.

Think about you plans, talk to your friends and family members about their plans, and how your plans and their plans can work together.

What kind of disaster are you planning for – hurricane, wildfire, plague, earthquake,,,,,, or something else?

Instead of trying to find the solution here, real through this list of forum threads about Bug Out Plans, and go from there.

Related article – Bug Out Essentials.

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Kevin Felts

Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm clearing brush, working on a fence, building something, or tending to the livestock