Rural Lifestyle

Life in Rural America

Three Day Bug Out Test

Three Day Bug Out Test
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Back in July of 2008, (July 4th weekend to be exact), my family and I went up to the deer camp for three days.  While the kids were having fun playing in the creek, I was taking notes.   To my family it was just a relaxing weekend.  To me, it was time to test some stuff and take notes.

The observations play a role in my pepping plans.

Infant Formula / Baby Food

While we were at the camp my step daughter ran out of powdered formula. Its no big deal, we just drove the 15 – 20 miles back to town. On the flip side, what if we could not make the trip? What if there was no store with baby food stocks?

After hurricanes and other natural disasters food shipments are disrupted, this includes baby food.

Joe is at the age were he can eat real food from our table. If we were not able to get formula, he would have had to eat from his mothers plate.

Cooking

This was no big deal. I pulled the pit to the camp and smoked 2 briskets over night, for about 12 hours. Then the next morning I put 2 racks of ribs on. Along with some beans, and corn on the cob. You talk about GOOD!!!! My stepsons truck in the background. We also cooked a package of chicken legs.

Smoker on wheels

All the time and effort I put into building such a large pit was paying off.  We were able to cook for everyone with no problems.

Now it is just a matter of keeping firewood cut and split for the pit.

Cold Food

One of my investments is a Coleman 100 Quart extreme 5 day cooler. When we left home Thursday my wife got 3 bags of ice for the ice chest. Sunday evening the water was still cold. We had ice until Saturday evening – and this was with the kids getting soft drinks out for 3 days. Currently I am considering a 7 day coleman extreme ice chest, with at least 100 quarts in size.

Once the food has been cooked, it can be stored in the ice chest to keep it warm. For this purpose a Coleman 7 day extreme 54 quart would be good.

This would have given us about a weeks head start on planting the crops if this would have been a real SHTF situation.

Tools / Chains / Tow Straps

We had the hand tools on hand to take care of a couple of jobs, but we need some more tow straps or a couple of tow chains.  Its always good to have some tools at the camp.

Maybe pick up spare hand tools during holiday sales?

Hand Soap and Hand Sanitizer

We had enough soap to last the weekend and a few more days. But after a week or so, we would be out of soap and hand sanitizer. Hand washing is the single must important thing anyone can do to prevent the spread of disease.

Over the next few months I need to stock up on the hand soap pump bottles and some of the gallon sized re-fills.

Personal Hygiene

This might fall under the soap section, but oh well. While I was at the camp I took the time to swap out some contact lens solution for some fresh stuff. I keep a bottle of lens cleaner and an extra contact case at the camp. We had plenty of tooth paste and everyone got a shower every day.

I suspect that people who wear contacts are going to start having eye infections if S ever HTF.
Maybe have a spare pair of glasses on hand?

Cooking

This is where we had a problem. A friend of the family, his girl friend and her 2 small children came to the camp and spent the night with us. The sleeping arrangements was no big deal, we had the room. The problem was the next day, at lunch time our guest put a large pot of beans on the gas stove.

I don’t guess he was use to cooking on a gas stove because he burnt the beans rather badly. A circle of beans had turned black and stuck to the bottom of the pot. Most of the beans were still edible. The next day however it took considerable time, soap and effort to remove the burned beans from the bottom of the pot.

As I was scrapping the beans from the pot, I took into consideration how much effort, water, soap and time I was putting into fixing a simple mistake.

Conclusion

The next time I got to the camp some supplies need to be dropped off. Such as soap refills, hand sanitizer, tow strap and some more first aid supplies.

Overall, I think things over the three days went well.  The kids had a great time playing in the creek, and I was able to make numerous observations.

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Kevin Felts was born and raised in southeast Texas, graduated from Bridge City high school Bridge City Texas, and attended Lamar College in Port Arthur Texas. Hobbies include fishing, hiking, hunting, blogging, sharing his politically incorrect opinion, video blogging on youtube, survivalism and spending time with his family. In his free time you may find Kevin working around the farm, building something, or tending to the livestock
Kevin Felts © 2008 - 2018