Homesteading and Survivalism

Ramblings Of A Bored Survivalist

Archive for July, 2008

The survivalist and their Bug Out Bag

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 30, 2008 Comments Off

One of the popular “survival” plans is the “Bug Out Bag” (aka BOB). Members of the survival community that use the Bug out bag, and a “head to the hills” philosophy are sometimes called backpack survivalist. The “backpack survivalist” is a person who plans on leaving their home either ahead of a disaster or during  [ Read More ]




Identify this fruit tree

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 26, 2008 Comments Off

One of the purposes of this site is to not only inform, but to provoke thought.  One of the ways this is done is to ask a question.  In the question, there lies the information.  Now then, let us begin. This shrub or tree grows to be about 20 feet tall, but rarely gets over  [ Read More ]




How to grow Zucchini

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 23, 2008 Comments Off

Zucchini is a small summer squash and a member of the melon / gourd family. It has an outer skin that can harden if left on the plant for too long – kinda like a watermelon or pumpkin. The immature fruit are best when picked at about 6 inches in length. Zucchini can be yellow,  [ Read More ]




What to expect from the Red Cross

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 21, 2008 Comments Off

After Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans, a summer camp in east texas took in about 400 evacuees.  The camp in question was used during the summer by several of the local churches for religious and non-religious based events.  When hurricane Katrina struck, the camp was closed for the winter – no church or religious services  [ Read More ]




The Survivalist Garden and Cucumbers

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 19, 2008 Comments Off

cucumber survivalist gardenWhile planning a survival garden that will be used during a prolonged disaster, cucumbers should be an important consideration.

During outbreaks of the Bubonic Plague (The Black Death) during the middle 1300′s, starvation might have killed as many people as the disease. As farmers and merchants died off from The Black Death, those that were still alive were left to a slow death of starvation. It was recorded in the journals of the witnesses to The Black Death – the starving masses even turned to cannibalism.

To prevent this type of situation from befalling family members and loved ones, every survivalist should have a stock of seeds for a home garden.




Spinach for a survival garden

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 17, 2008 Comments Off

survivalist garden spinachHistory: The origin of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is in some debate. Some researchers put the origin of Spinach around current day Iraq. While other researchers claim that Nepal is where the plant was first domesticated.

Planting: Spinach has to be replanted every year. This is also known as an annual plant. Even though Spinach may need to be replanted every year, it might survive over winter in temperate regions. Spinach germinates best if the seeds are soaked in water, or between wet rags for at least 24 hours before planting. Best results for germination may occur if the seeds are soaked for 3 – 5 days, or until the seed starts to sprout.




Survival Quiz – ID this plant

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 17, 2008 Comments Off

This is a Survival Quiz to test your knowledge of wild plants. The location of the plant is in a pond that is connected to a salt water marsh. The salt water marsh is connected to the Gulf of Mexico. The water in the pond has a high salt water content and is considered “brackish.”  [ Read More ]




Preparedness planning and baby food considerations

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 15, 2008 Comments Off

If there is one aspect of disaster planning that is often over looked, that is baby food and baby formula. While on a recent 3 day trip to the camp, one of the first supplies to run out was my grandsons baby formula. My stepdaughter did not pack enough of the dry powdered formula to get through the 3 day stay. This was no big deal. We just drove back to town, which was about a 20 minute drive.

But, what would things had been like if we had been in a disaster area? After regional or localized disasters, such as earthquakes or hurricanes – the government says to be prepared for at least 72 hours, which is 3 days. During this time do not expect any help or relief services.




Long term survival plans

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 12, 2008 0 Comments

Do you have a long term survival plan? We are not talking 3 days, or 3 weeks, or 3 months,,, how about 3 years? If there was a total break down of society, what would you do?

My plans are like a flow chart, with a bunch of “ifs” on it. If power, no power, if long term, if short term, if food runs out before life returns back to normal, when will the local community have support from the outside world, is the disaster local, nation wide or world wide. In all there are 4 major plans – A, B, C, & D.

Food plan A – First Tier:

The first level in your survival food preps are the frozen foods in your freezer and the foods that you have to keep cold. In the event of a power outage, these are the foods that should be cooked and eaten first.

The main course for the first week or so will be meat and anything else in the freezers. The time line for this depends on the generator. If the power goes out, gas = food. For every day we can keep the food in the freezer frozen, or cold, that is an extra day we get to eat out of it. One of my investments has been a 100 quart 5 day cooler. Storing some frozen good in these high quality ice chest could extend their freshness by 5 – days This is the deep freezer. It is full of deer meat, sausage, hamburger and ribs. Each package of ribs has 3 slabs in it. The white packages are full of deer mixed with beef hamburger. Notice the tub in the top right hand corner, we will discuss that in a little bit.

If the power goes out, and the food is spoiling before we can eat it – the plan is to have a massive bar-b-q and invite all our neighbors over. The smoker is used to make whatever into jerky. I like to think I have a way to cook without power. At this family reunion, I cooked enough for 100+ people at one time.




Winter survival and cold weather clothing

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 9, 2008 Comments Off

This article was originally posted by coyotemountain on the survivalist discussion forum. Man has forever been at odds with the temperature of his environment. Our body generates a metabolically controlled core temperature of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit; the ideal temperature at which cellular respiration proceeds most efficiently for most organs in the human body. Learning how  [ Read More ]




Wilderness Survival – Yaupon Holly

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 7, 2008 Comments Off

Some wild animals and birds eat the Yaupon Holly, but the berries cause vomiting in humans. The latin name is Ilex vomitoria.  Anything that has “vomit” in the name should be avoided. Related PostsSustainable food sources after TEOTWAWKI 16 gallon portable water solution Plans for 2009 Tips on how to bury a cache tube Trail  [ Read More ]




Survival Gear – Splitting Mauls

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 7, 2008 Comments Off

Splitting mauls are different from an axe.  The maul is heavier and wider then and axe and usually has a dull edge.  The back side of the maul is sometimes flat so a sledge hammer can be used to drive it through blocks of wood. Every survivalist should have a way to cut firewood in  [ Read More ]




Stacking Firewood

Posted by Kevin Felts On July 7, 2008 Comments Off

Firewood, for a long term S hit the fan situation, its going to be the primary way that people are going to be cooking and heating their homes. One of the ways I’am going to be using firewood post-SHTF is in my wood burning barbeque pit. It has a cooking surface 6 feet 9 inches  [ Read More ]